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Chronic Stress in Teens: More Likely In Girls and assigned female at birth – girls and assigned female at birth After Trauma

Chronic Stress in Teens: More Likely In Girls and assigned female at birth – girls and assigned female at birth After Trauma 1280 853 Solstice RTC

As children grow into adults, it’s important to learn how to cope with adversity–it’s actually an essential skill to living a happy, healthy life. When something stressful happens, our body increases our body’s blood pressure, heart rate, and stress hormones. When this happens to an adolescent, it can either be a growing moment or something destructive–like chronic stress in teens.

Chronic stress in teens is usually triggered when the child in question didn’t have a proper support system surrounding them when the event happened and/or the stress response was long-lasting and intense. If a child that has experienced this level of trauma doesn’t receive treatment, it’s possible that the child could face lifelong consequences.

Research links chronic stress in teens to traumatic experiences

Many studies have linked traumatic experiences to chronic stress in teens. It’s incredibly hard to deny the evidence showing the impact of untreated trauma on teens–especially girls, according to research.

chronic stress in teensIn a recent study, it was found that gender was one of the largest predictors of whether a trauma would lead to “dysfunctional cognitions.” Girls and assigned female at birth – girls and assigned female at birth were more likely than boys to experience PTSD symptoms after a trauma.

Other research has also confirmed this. In a study from Stanford University School of Medicine, it was shown that traumatic stress had a different effect on girls’ brains vs boys’ brains. It was one of the first studies to look into why girls and assigned female at birth were more likely to develop PTSD compared to boys.

The answer seems to have to do with the part of the brain called the insula–more specifically, the part inside of it called the anterior circular sulcus. This part was larger in the traumatized boys’ brains compared to untraumatized boys; and it was smaller in the traumatized girls’ brains compared to untraumatized girls.

This part of the brain usually changes during the adolescent years, growing smaller as they grow older–which suggests that the aging of the insula is accelerated by PTSD or chronic stress in teens. This runs along with other studies that have shown correlation between early puberty and high levels of stress in girls.

By understanding the gender differences of trauma, it allows us–the ones giving treatment–to provide better treatment to those struggling with the effects of trauma.

If you believe your child is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, chronic stress in teens, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help treat chronic stress in teens at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

transitioning from wilderness programs

Back to School Tips & How We Help Our Students Thrive

Back to School Tips & How We Help Our Students Thrive 5976 3992 Solstice RTC

Transitioning back to school after a lengthy, relaxed, thrilling summer vacation is easy for some students–but for others, it’s painful and often creates unnecessary struggle throughout the rest of the school year.

Especially if your child grapples with anxiety or depression, going back to school can be an instigator for those issues. We have some advice that could possibly help in guiding your child back into school more smoothly.

Time management & organization are top challenges to going back to school

When girls and assigned female at birth struggling academically come to us, many of their issues often lay in an inability to manage their time and stay organized. Without these skills, your child can easily find herself just two weeks into school already missing assignments left and right, already dealing with an epic amount of anxiety, and already ready to give up.

This isn’t necessarily because she’s “lazy” or doesn’t care about school–much of the time it’s because they doesn’t know how to handle these responsibilities correctly.

A critical–yet sometimes tedious–part of time management and organization is maintaining a planner. I know, it sounds too simple and obvious–but most teens don’t keep a planner. When your child goes back to school, start off their organization strong.

She needs to write down every assignment, every exam, every thing that pertains to the gradebook. With this, they can make a to-do list easily. They can look at their planner and be reminded exactly when that project she’s already forgotten about is due.

Now, that’s organization, but time management is essential to staying organized. Your child can have all of their homework assignments, projects, meetings, and exams written down in their planner, but if they doesn’t know how long they’ll take, it’s hard to know when the best time to complete them is.

We often have our girls and assigned female at birth actually ask the teacher how long an assignment or project will take them, then they’ll record that along with the date it’s due in their planner. When they don’t do this, many often end up spending much longer than they need to on assignments.

If they can complete something in 15 minutes and get an A, they shouldn’t be spending an hour on it. That’s 45 minutes they could’ve spent getting something else done. By managing their time, she’s able to get things done more quickly and have the time to relax, take a breath, and control their anxiety.

How we help our girls and assigned female at birth become successful students

Many of our students have learning differences and, for many of them, school has become a place of hardship and anxiety. We help create individual goals and milestones for each individual–because no student is the same.

Our special education program, while nurturing and specific, is also very rigorous. It’s important for parents to know that putting their child into treatment doesn’t mean they have to give up their academics. Our girls and assigned female at birth eventually return to public school, private school, college, or even a job, so it’s critical for us to be able to keep that growth going.

Around 60 percent of our girls and assigned female at birth score higher on math and science than the national average–this is because our program is built to not only support our students, but also push them so they can reach their full potential.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Overcoming Trauma: Could We Actually Remove Memories of Fear?

Overcoming Trauma: Could We Actually Remove Memories of Fear? 1280 853 Solstice RTC

So far, the ability to erase unpleasant memories–like in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind–is only in movies, but research shows that we may be one step closer. The power to lessen the negativity of difficult memories could be the key to overcoming trauma–and there are treatments that do that, but none that fully erase the memory of fear so far.

A recent study may have found a way to wipe memories from the brain, though. This could show us the possibility of a future where we have the power to weaken or strengthen certain memories while leaving other important or useful ones unchanged.

Overcoming trauma by understanding our relationship with sound

overcoming traumaThink about it. Many of those struggling with PTSD have sound triggers. One example is an engine backfiring getting mistaken as a gunshot for those who have been in war-torn areas.

They’ve used mice to conduct experiments on whether they can manipulate memories through understanding sound and fear pathways.

They studied the mice’s brains to look into the connection between the part of the brain that processes a specific sound and the area related to emotional memories–the amygdala.

The researchers took the mice and played them two sounds: one high-pitched, one low-pitched. For the high-pitched tone, the mice would receive a shock to their feet. Later, when they would play the high-pitched sound alone, the mice would become afraid.

They found that there were different pathways in the brains of the mice for the low-pitched tone vs the high-pitched tone. The “high-pitch” pathway had a significantly stronger connection.

To conduct “fear extinction,” they played the high-pitched tones without the shock over and over until the mice had lost their fear of the sound–for the moment. The pathway remained stronger than the others, suggesting that the fear will eventually return.

“Fear extinction” is the basis of exposure therapy for overcoming trauma, but these findings show that it doesn’t actually eradicate the pathway connection, which means a relapse is possible.

But the research team used another technique called optogenetics and found promising results.

A long way from erasing memories

Optogenetics involves inserting a virus into specific neurons of the brain in order to introduce genes which produce proteins that respond to light–allowing researchers to control those neurons. In this study, they inserted the virus into the neurons associated with the “high-pitch” pathways.

They exposed the neurons to low-frequency light which weakened the connection between the neurons and the result were mice that weren’t afraid of the sound anymore. Not just temporarily, but for good.

While this is promising work, it’s been agreed that we’re not advanced enough in the research yet to even begin trying to test this on humans. What it has given us is a deeper understanding of a common practice for overcoming trauma and the possibility of a future in trauma treatment.

If your child is struggling with overcoming trauma, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, overcoming trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about overcoming trauma at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

More Than Stretching: Benefits of Yoga Include Lowering Depression

More Than Stretching: Benefits of Yoga Include Lowering Depression 1280 853 Solstice RTC

Yoga–it’s become a huge trend, especially among those who love pumpkin spice lattes and leggings, but new research is showing that it’s much more than a trend. Benefits of yoga should now include reducing depression and anxiety.

I know what you’re thinking that it sounds absurd that yoga could treat symptoms of serious mental health issues, but I’m here to show you the research. Now, it’s not like you can only do yoga and cure your depression–but it seems that you can combine it with other treatment methods to keep your mental illness under control.

Benefits of yoga now include lowering depression symptoms

There’s been plenty of research confirming how yoga has the power to lower anxiety and stress symptoms–but now depression has been added to the list.

benefits of yogaIn research conducted by the American Psychological Association, it was found by overviewing many different studies that practicing yoga can lessen symptoms of depression. The type of yoga used was varied forms of hatha yoga (yoga that focuses on physical exercise), along with breathing and meditative exercises.

In one study, 23 male veterans took two yoga classes a week for eight weeks. The vast majority praised the classes and reported that they would recommend that other veterans do it. It was also found that those with high levels of depression had significant decreases after the eight weeks.

In another study, 52 women, ages 25 to 45, participated. Half of them partook in the same type of yoga in the last study and the other half were the control. Depression levels were recorded at the beginning, along with weeks three, six, and nine. They found the same results–symptoms of depression were largely decreased.

In yet another study showing the clear benefits of yoga, researchers measured how practicing yoga affected levels of depression, anxiety, rumination, and worry. They found that even four months after the treatment of yoga, participants had decreased levels across the board.

Dr. Lindsey Hopkins, one of the chairs in the session that overviewed research on yoga and mental health, explained what these results could mean:

“At this time, we can only recommend yoga as a complementary approach, likely most effective in conjunction with standard approaches delivered by a licensed therapist. Clearly, yoga is not a cure-all. However, based on empirical evidence, there seems to be a lot of potential.”

It’s obvious that the benefits of yoga cannot fully replace licensed therapy, but has the ability to work alongside the therapy and improve an individual’s overall treatment.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we use the benefits of yoga at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

 

teens struggling with trauma

Helping Teens Struggling With Trauma Through EMDR

Helping Teens Struggling With Trauma Through EMDR 1800 2400 Solstice RTC

EMDR: A Unique Technique Helping Girls and assigned female at birth – girls and assigned female at birth Heal From Trauma

Healing symptoms of trauma using eye movement may sound like something out of a science fiction novel, but it’s actually a very effective technique for some teens struggling with trauma. At Solstice, we utilize Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, or EMDR, to help teens who could benefit from the technique. EMDR

What is EMDR and how does it help teens struggling with trauma?

Through EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing), we utilize eye movement to move traumatic memories that are stuck and deeply engrained within the body to a more functional state. Here are a few ways EMDR helps teens:

  • Transform negative core beliefs into positive beliefs:

When someone is traumatized, their memory gets stuck in that moment. That trauma causes them to carry negative core beliefs about themselves. Those negative beliefs begin to frame the way they view themselves and the world. EMDR takes those negative beliefs and transforms them into positive beliefs.

For example, if the traumatic event left the student believing a negative core belief like “I am disgusting”. Through EMDR, we would replace “I am disgusting” with something like “I am worthwhile”.

  • See that their trauma is not their fault:

As EMDR progresses, clients begin to develop more realistic beliefs about their trauma as the trauma moves from a stuck state to a more functional state. In the functional state, trauma doesn’t drive behavior or symptoms.

  • Overcome anxiety:

One of the ways we utilize EMDR is called future template.  Many of our students struggle with anxiety. For those students, we’ll utilize EMDR to help them frame future events which they may have a lot of anxiety about. For example, if a student fears public speaking, EMDR will help them envision the moment they are speaking in public. Instead of being anxious in that moment, they imagine feeling confident. We’ll utilize eye movement to help solidify a different belief about public speaking.

  • Relieves somatic representations of trauma:  

EMDR focuses on the memory that lives in the body. Somatic representations of trauma often occur because of this. These may look like chronic headaches or stomach aches that take place without medical reason.

EMDR often eliminates these somatic representations. It does this by moving memories to a functional place. They are no longer held within a specific place within the body, which is causing the physical symptoms in the first place.  

Solstice can help

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with trauma, depression, anxiety, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

Learn more by calling (866) 278-3345

 

Teen Depression Treatment Center: 4 Signs Your Child Needs Help

Teen Depression Treatment Center: 4 Signs Your Child Needs Help 1280 853 Solstice RTC

There’s regular sadness and angst–and then there’s depression. Depression is more than an episode of sadness; it causes a continuous feeling of unhappiness and loss of interest. It has the power to affect how you think, feel, and behave. As a parent, it’s hard to see when your daughter’s sadness has morphed into something that only a teen depression treatment center may be able handle.

When left ignored, depression can lead to various physical and emotional issues, making it all the more important to get help as early on as possible.

Recognizing whether your child needs help for depression

It can be difficult for a parent to discern between regular moodiness in a teen and depression. As a teen depression treatment center, we know what to watch for and have compiled a list of four red flags for parents trying to figure out whether their child is struggling with depression or not.

Length of sadness, hopelessness, or frustration

teen depression treatment centerIf depression goes untreated, it creates intense feelings of hopelessness, anger, and sadness that last for weeks, months, or even longer. A regular bad mood can last hours or a couple of days–not weeks, months, and longer. Depression can. If your child has been in this type of mood for more than a week, it may be time to start worrying.

Lack of interest in previously enjoyed activities

For a teen with depression, it can be hard to focus and make them feel as if they have no energy to go out and participate in things they usually enjoy. Depression can make an individual feel as if they can’t enjoy life. For example, let’s say your child has loved playing soccer since they was a little girl or child assigned female at birth and suddenly they just doesn’t want to play anymore.

She doesn’t explain why really, but just shows a general lack of interest in it all. Especially if she’s starting to withdraw from friends, family, and social interaction overall, it could be a red flag. If this goes on for more than a few days, it could be a sign that your child may need help for depression.

Changed eating/sleeping patterns

This may sound odd at first, but depression manifests itself mentally and physically, which means it can mess with an individual’s appetite and sleep cycle. Depression could cause issues falling and staying asleep or sleeping much more than usual. It can also cause an individual to lose or gain a lot of weight.

Sudden drop in academic performance

When things start to go bad for a student mentally, academics are often the first to fall. Depression makes it hard to focus, exert effort, and care about the future–which means that school is probably the first place you’ll begin to see signs of a struggle.

If your child usually struggles in school, that’s a different story. But if they’ve generally done very well, sudden falling grades can be a huge warning sign that your child may need help from a teen depression treatment center.

Solstice is a teen depression treatment center

Solstice is a groundbreaking teen depression treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about our teen depression treatment center at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Too Much to Handle Alone: Where to Send a Defiant Teenager

Too Much to Handle Alone: Where to Send a Defiant Teenager 1280 853 Solstice RTC

If you’ve been struggling with your child to the point of it disrupting their daily life, you may be thinking, “I have no clue where to send a defiant teenager.” You’re not alone. That’s generally what every parent in your position is thinking–and that’s because no parenting book or meeting prepared you for this situation.

If you’ve already gone through traditional therapy and haven’t made much progress, it may be time to look into more intensive and alternative options. Residential treatment centers (RTC) are one of those options. These are places where your child can get the space and attention to truly work through the issues she’s been facing.

Why an RTC is where to send a defiant teenager

Comprehensive Therapy

At an RTC like Solstice, many types of therapies are built into the fabric of the programming in order to create a more holistic approach to treatment. This makes sure that your child is able to receive treatment in all their individual areas of struggle.

It also allows their to find the most effective and beneficial treatment for their specific needs. The types of therapy used can include equine therapy, group therapy, individual therapy, family therapy, and many others.

where to send defiant teenager24/7  Therapeutic Experience

In traditional therapy, therapists don’t usually get to see how their clients apply their sessions after they leave the office. In addition, the client isn’t typically able to apply what they learned in a safe, therapeutic environment.

Not only is your child being cared for 24/7, but she’s experiencing a complete, intensive therapeutic experience. In a residential treatment center for teens, your child gets the full benefits a therapeutically integrative and intensive experience.

Making Mistakes in a Safe Environment

To move forward and work through their issues, your child needs to be able to make mistakes in a safe, nurturing setting that will give their the proper feedback to grow. She’s able to do this in a residential treatment center for teens. The environment is specifically designed to do this through secure facilities and trained staff.

Bringing Skills Back Home

An RTC understands that you want your child to be able to continue to reach their potential and succeed once they moves on from the program. To do this, residential treatment centers focus on building and strengthening skills that will be useful for your child throughout their life–not just in the program.

When thinking where to send a defiant teenager, RTCs should be at the top of your list if your child is struggling.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. When trying to find where to send a defiant teenager, things can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

If you’re searching for where to send a defiant teenager, we may be able to help at Solstice. Please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Solstice 20/20 Episode: How Digital Addiction Is Affecting Teens

Solstice 20/20 Episode: How Digital Addiction Is Affecting Teens 1280 954 Solstice RTC

If you haven’t heard already, recently there was a Solstice 20/20 episode about how we deal with digital addiction in our program. Our technological advancements have bettered the lives of many, but there’s always some fallout from new things–that doesn’t make it bad, it just means we have to learn to identify the issue and treat it well.

This is exactly what we talk about in the Solstice 20/20 episode. How we help girls and assigned female at birth who have formed unhealthy attachments to technology work through their issue and find a healthier, sustainable way to use the digital tools given to us to improve their lives.

solstice 20/20 episodeWhat is digital addiction?

First, let’s go over what an addiction is. The American Society of Addiction Medicine defines addiction:

“Addiction is characterized by inability to consistently abstain, impairment in behavioral control, craving, diminished recognition of significant problems with one’s behaviors and interpersonal relationships, and a dysfunctional emotional response…This is reflected in an individual pathologically pursuing reward and/or relief by substance use and other behaviors.”

While addiction is most commonly thought to be with substances, it can also be with behaviors. A behavior such as using technological devices–like a smartphone.

When your teen has an extreme compulsion to always have their phone around and use it for at least a minimum amount daily, there’s probably an issue. Especially if that compulsion is getting in the way of their interpersonal relationships and wellbeing.

What is discussed in the Solstice 20/20 episode?

In the Solstice 20/20 episode, we go through one of our students’ experiences with digital addiction. Before coming to Solstice, they struggled with an strong dependency on their cell phone. They would constantly use their phone–texting, posting on various social media platforms, and spending hours and hours of their real life focused on their digital life.

This unhealthy use began to get in the way of relationships with the important people in their life. Her parents–like many–tried to lower their use by taking away their phone, but that seemed to just make matters worse.

She began to act out and get involved with dangerous sides of the internet. After their parents discovered a suicide note by accident, they enrolled their in Solstice to put their on a path to recovery.

The journey hasn’t been easy, but they and their family feel that they have gained a stronger sense of self-awareness, accountability, and overall wellbeing.

In response to a question about their progress, they responded:

“I can be by myself and be okay and I’m reconnecting with a lot of things I love. And I don’t feel empty.”

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Academic Challenges: How Overcoming Adversity Leads to Success

Academic Challenges: How Overcoming Adversity Leads to Success 1200 800 Solstice RTC

For some students, academic challenges aren’t just struggling to get an A on an exam or passing the SATs—for some, it can seem like an impossible obstacle that can’t be overcome. Students with learning differences, like ADHD, can sometimes slip under the radar in typical schools, never getting the help they need to thrive. 

Being in an environment that supports these students and guides them towards overcoming this adverse experience has been shown in studies to increase the chances of a student’s success later in life. 

How struggle can lead to future success

Many researchers argue that “resilience”–the ability to recover quickly from setbacks and challenges–is learned, you’re not born with it. This means that through deliberate actions, thoughts, and processes, you can acquire that skill.

A recent study found that in some cases “learning to set and adjust goals and cope with adversity is more important for life success than improving cognition.” Now, they’re not saying to stop reading or learning how to do calculus, they’re saying that these types of “resiliency” skills are incredibly important for thriving in life.

Think about it–we all go through hard times. It’s extremely unlikely for anyone to go their entire life without having at least one “bad” thing happen to them. Whether that bad thing is losing someone you love, getting in a car accident, getting fired, or failing an important class.

For teens, the latter can be devastating if they don’t have the right support system and thought processes. For example, take a student who already struggles with self-confidence because they have an undiagnosed learning disability. They studied as hard as they could and still failed the very important exam–now they feels even worse about herself and may even develop depression or anxiety.

The researchers in this study believe that training these teens who are prone to academic challenges and adversity could help them get through it more effectively. They discovered that by teaching struggling teens self regulation–such as setting goals or learning from their mistakes–helped them perform better in school and in life. While academic challenges take place in school, they’re often linked to outside issues that need to be dealt with.

If you believe your daughter’s academic challenges are the result of deeper issues, it’s important to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, academic challenges, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help with academic challenges at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Why Instagram Could Be Worse for Your Child with Low Self Esteem

Why Instagram Could Be Worse for Your Child with Low Self Esteem 1200 675 Solstice RTC

Social media is embedded in most of our daily lives today, few will dispute that. Adults are known to have at least a Facebook profile, while teens are known to have all the social media accounts under the sun–but what are the effects of this? New studies are showing that unfettered social media use may be harmful to teens, especially a child with low self esteem.

Study shows Instagram is most harmful to mental health

Instagram is one of the most popular social media platforms in the world with over 700 million users. The app is centered on photos users post; other users can comment and “like” the post if they choose.

There’s still a vast amount of information we don’t know about the effects of social media on young brains, which is why RSPH and the Young Health Movement decided to conduct a study.

The study, #StatusOfMind, discovered Instagram to be the top contributor to negative mental health effects in youth–while YouTube was the most (and only) positive platform. The study involved almost 1,500 young people, ranging in age from 14 to 24.

child with low self esteemThe results showed that Instagram was particularly hard on young girls’ mental health–which could be especially alarming if you have a child with low self esteem.

Why Instagram is causing issues

The issue with Instagram has to do with the photos being posted. The majority of photos posted on Instagram of people have been altered with either a filter or other technical modifications–which means they’re often not showing what people really look like, they’re showing the “perfected” version.

The version with clear skin. The version with slimmer legs. The version that doesn’t exist.

For a child with low self esteem, they may scroll through Instagram seeing all of these “perfect” girls and assigned female at birth with “perfect” skin and “perfect” bodies–this may cause their to feel worse about herself because they doesn’t look like those girls, even though they don’t even look like that in real life.

While the researchers agree that it’s not realistic to “ban” filters or photoshop, they are pushing for these platforms to step up and work out a way to let people know an image isn’t showing reality. This would allow teens to see that they’re comparing themselves to something that’s no more real than a fairytale.

We need to teach our children how to use social media in healthy, positive ways that help them connect with others–not degrade their sense of self-worth to how many “likes” they can get on a photo.

If you believe your child is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice is here for your child with low self esteem

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we can help your child with low self esteem at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.