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Solstice RTC

Help for Learning Differences: Recognizing the Signs in Your Daughter

Help for Learning Differences: Recognizing the Signs in Your Daughter 1280 853 Solstice RTC

Knowing whether your child needs help for learning differences or not can be a challenge for parents. Many questions swim around in your head: Does they have ADHD or does math just bore her? Does they really hate reading or is it because they have a learning disability?

These questions are normal and you’re not alone–many children need help for learning differences, it’s nothing to be ashamed of. Sometimes teens with learning differences slip under the radar in the typical school system and never thrive in education, which is why there are specific options for your teen if you believe they may have an issue.

Recognizing whether your child needs help for learning differences

Teens will rarely ask for help–but that’s not hard to believe. Letters and numbers may be turning themselves upside down and around, but they may just play it off cool and act like they just hate school because they’re afraid of getting labeled “weird.” Because of this tendency to mask their issues through other means, it may be up to you to keep your eyes open.

help for learning differencesSome signs that your child may need help for learning differences include:

  • Issues spelling words correctly
  • Trouble with memory and frequently forgetful
  • Problems adjusting to new settings and environments
  • Avoids reading and writing assignments
  • Difficulty summarizing or grasping abstract concepts
  • Often misinterprets or misreads information
  • Either hyper-focuses or ignores details
  • Works slowly or spends a ton of time studying yet still struggles in class and with grades
  • Trouble following direction or staying organized

Any of the above symptoms could point to your child needing help for learning differences. Some parents decide to ignore it and hope it improves by itself–this is a grave mistake.

If your child truly does have a learning disability that’s keeping their from excelling in school, it probably won’t improve and will lead their down a difficult path. Instead, if you suspect they may have an issue, seek out a professional for further guidance.

Untreated learning differences can lead to much deeper issues such as depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and much more. Early intervention is the key to success in these cases–so the faster you check it out and figure out what’s going on, the better.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how provide help for learning differences at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

A Craving for ‘Likes’: Is It a Social Media Addiction?

A Craving for ‘Likes’: Is It a Social Media Addiction? 1280 720 Solstice RTC

There are certain reward centers in the brain that go crazy for things like chocolate or winning money, which explains why people binge on chocolate or continue to gamble even when they’re in debt. These reward centers also have to do with why social media addiction is an issue.  

While we still know very little about social media addiction and how it works, we’re beginning to understand it. One study even found that there may be a link between genetics and social media use, which could lead to a better understanding of how social media addiction works and how to tell if someone has a higher risk or not.

social media addictionSocial media addiction defined

Social media addiction isn’t officially classified as an addiction, but it’s a compulsive need to use social media–even if it’s in a dangerous situation, like driving. If your child were to have a social media addiction and you took away their form of accessing it, it’s likely that they would show symptoms like anxiety or mood swings.

Also, for someone with social media addiction, it’s likely they take the risk of checking social media while driving, which is on par with drunk driving. Social media addiction has the power to make someone risk their life, showing that it’s a dangerous attachment that can only be described as an addiction or harmful obsession.

Why it should be considered a ‘real’ addiction

A study conducted by the Pew Research Center found that nearly a quarter of all teens are online almost constantly. Now, that may not seem like an issue, but look at it this way. If you build that much of a reliance on something, it’s not always going to be healthy. Once it begins to interfere with interacting with others and the environment around you, there’s probably an issue.

In another study, it was found that if a teen saw a photo on Instagram–a social media platform–had a lot of likes or was liked by a friend, they would like it. Now if teens saw the exact photo, but with less likes or no likes from friends, they would be dramatically less likely to like it. This shows how friends have the power to influence a teen’s decisions and preferences.

The question is this: if your child is craving “likes” and is driven to “like” things with more “likes”, will they turn to methods to get “likes” even if they’re inappropriate? This is why we need to pay attention to the reality of social media addiction and the power it can hold over someone.

If you believe your child is struggling it’s critical to seek out help immediately.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, bullying, low self-esteem, social media addiction, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we treat social media addiction at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

10-Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation Can Improve Anxiety

10-Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation Can Improve Anxiety 1280 854 Solstice RTC

Anxiety is not uncommon for teenagers. Between friends, exams, homework, extracurriculars, and keeping your GPA up, life can get pretty stressful. Sometimes it gets so stressful that it starts to form unhealthy habits and underlying mental health issues–but studies are showing that there may be something that could help: mindfulness meditation.

I know what you’re thinking, “Meditation is going to fix my child’s anxiety?” No, that’s not what I’m saying. Mindfulness meditation has been shown to improve symptoms of anxiety and depression, making it a good tool to maintain mental health and act as a helper–not the only treatment.

Just 10-minutes of mindfulness meditation could help

The University of Waterloo recently conducted a study that showed how powerful mindfulness meditation can be. With over 80 individuals that struggle with anxiety, the researchers discovered that using mindfulness meditation reduced one of the most common symptoms of anxiety: repetitive, off-task thinking.

mindfulness meditationThe best part? It was only 10-minutes once a day. With just a few minutes out of the day, anxious individuals found improvements in their mind’s tendency to wander and overthink things. For people with anxiety, this can be one of the main things that disrupts their day. While it’s normal for the mind to wander, when it’s almost impossible to make it focus at times, that’s an issue.

Mindfulness meditation isn’t just about sitting in one place for 10-minutes. It’s about taking a moment to pull yourself out of your internal worries and focusing–without judgement–on how you’re feeling now and taking note of what’s around you in the current moment.

One of the researchers, Mengran Xu, discussed why the results are important:

“Our results indicate that mindfulness training may have protective effects on mind wandering for anxious individuals. We also found that meditation practice appears to help anxious people to shift their attention from their own internal worries to the present-moment external world, which enables better focus on a task at hand.”

Mindfulness meditation obviously has a lot of potential in the mental health fields. It’s a tactic that you can use nearly anywhere and almost anyone can master it.

If you believe your child is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, issues with bullying, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we use mindfulness meditation at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Teen Bullying: ’13 Reasons Why’ Brings Up Important Topics

Teen Bullying: ’13 Reasons Why’ Brings Up Important Topics 1280 848 Solstice RTC

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock or are one of the few who don’t have a Netflix subscription, you’ve probably heard of the show 13 Reasons Why. This show covers many topics considered fairly “taboo” in the sense of what’s portrayed on television. The overarching theme seems to be around teen bullying and what it can really push a person to do.

How 13 Reasons Why sheds light on teen bullying

While 13 Reasons Why has sparked massive debates about the possible glorification of suicide in the show, it has also sparked conversations about mental health–a subject not commonly the center of attention.

teen bullyingOne of the main focuses in the show is the effect teen bullying had on the main character, Hannah Baker. Hannah is a teen girl or child assigned female at birth that commits suicide, but before committing the act, they recorded 13 tapes outlining why they decided to take their own life. Many of the reasons have to do with teen bullying.

It shows how seemingly “little” things peers do to one another, whether they thought it was a big deal or not, can impact an individual intensely. Hannah was the victim of many forms of bullying.

She experienced teen bullying in and out of school. Rumors were spread about their by their peers, whether they were true or not. They was harassed online. Many students go through this in today’s world, which is why it has resonated with so many–controversy aside.

Creators of the show have argued that they wanted to show the possible devastating effect we can have on someone. In one interview, a mother mentioned how they felt about the show, “Some of it, I’m worried, is glamorizing of suicide, but if Zoe [her daughter] is talking to me about it, it makes me feel better.”

It is almost impossible to keep teens from getting exposed to viral things online–which is why it’s important to have an open channel of communication, like the mother mentioned before. Discussing the show allows you to talk about not just some mixed messages it could be sending, but also about the effects of teen bullying and other mental health struggles.

If you believe your child is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, issues with teen bullying, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help with teen bullying at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

coping with loss

Coping with Loss Shows Itself in Different Ways for Teenagers

Coping with Loss Shows Itself in Different Ways for Teenagers 2431 2560 Solstice RTC

Here’s a fact that many parents forget: coping with loss as a teenager is much different than dealing with it as an adult. It’s relatively common to have lost at least one close person in your life or experienced something mildly traumatic by the time you reach your mid-twenties. Many teens work through it fine, but some struggle.

Those that struggle usually were never taught how to deal with grief or loss, causing them to lash out in unhealthy ways. Coping with loss is an essential skill in life. Teaching your child how to effectively work through grief and loss will help their in the future when she’s inevitably faced with that difficult moment.

How coping with loss is different in teens

Coping with loss shows itself in different ways for teens than it does for older folks. Understanding these differences can greatly help a parent in helping their teen cope with a loss in their life.

Teens are more likely to experience sudden or traumatic losses. Almost three-quarters of all deaths between the ages of 12 and 19 are caused by accidents, homicide, and suicide. That means that it’s not incredibly rare for a teen to experience a loss. Even losses that would be considered “natural” tend to feel more unexpected than it would for an adult.

Leaning towards isolating in the face of trauma. During the adolescent years, it’s pretty natural for teens to drift away from their parents—but this also makes it harder for them to seek out support from their parents when they’re hurting. If a student has passed away at your teen’s school, it’s good to just take a moment to have a calm, private conversation about whether they knew the person or not.

Fear of what others may think. The teenage years are filled with insecurity and a yearning to fit in. Because of this, in the face of coping with loss, they may try to act as if they aren’t affected by it. They may be afraid to be considered “the girl or child assigned female at birth whose mom died.” As a parent or guardian, it’s good to continue to watch for any signs of struggle with loss.

They may try to cover it up by acting out. One of the most common ways of coping with loss in teens is to act out. They start experimenting with drugs, alcohol, or begin skipping school. These “delinquent” behaviors act as a way for them to try to cope with or forget about the trauma they’re going through. Teens usually turn to acting out when they haven’t been guided towards a healthier way of coping with loss.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, issues with coping with loss, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help teens in coping with loss at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Self Identity in Teens: Social Media Is Getting in the Way

Self Identity in Teens: Social Media Is Getting in the Way 1280 854 Solstice RTC

The shaping of self identity in teens is one of the most important and most vulnerable processes of our lives. The self identity that we build during the adolescent years follows us into adulthood, which makes it an extremely critical period of time. Social media could be negatively affecting it, though.

We live in a world where nearly every teenager has access to social media, whether it’s through their own device, a friend’s, or a shared one at home. This level of connectivity has opened many doors in the way of communication, but it has also brought about questions of the negative impact it can have on forming minds.

Social media can negatively impact young girls

self identity in teensSocial media is largely based on looks. We already know that the images and expectations depicted by the media can be incredibly harmful on a young girl’s forming mind, social media just makes it easier to pass along those messages.

While social media is an inspirational and revolutionary means of connecting with others, focusing on appearances is never good for a girl’s mental health–and that’s exactly what social media tends to focus on and “reward” with likes.

Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook (just to name a few) are among the most used social media platforms by adolescents, and they all heavily rely on the approval of others through “likes” and comments.

If self identity in teens is based on how many “likes” you receive on a post, then there’s always going to be someone who has more, and for that person, there’s always going to be someone who has more, and so on. It’s a vicious cycle that makes absolutely no sense.

Many teen girls and assigned female at birth strive to get the coolest and most perfect photos just for their online presence to appear “active” and “fun”–even if they’re not actually having fun in real life. This type of behavior and thinking can lead to mental health issues like depression or anxiety.

Self identity in teens needs to be nourished and built by more than just “likes” and shares on social media. As parents, it’s our job to step in and offer support if we notice our child isn’t basing their self-worth on things that truly matter.

If you believe your child truly is struggling, it’s imperative to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, issues with self identity in teens, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help self identity in teens at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

ptsd treatment for girls

The Critical Components of PTSD Treatment for Girls

The Critical Components of PTSD Treatment for Girls 1280 853 Solstice RTC

Specifically in residential PTSD treatment for girls, there are many important components needed in order to ensure the best results. It’s not just about the PTSD-specific therapies being offered, it’s also about the setting, staff, and feeling the whole program provides.

What makes residential PTSD treatment for girls and assigned female at birth effective

  • Nurturing Environment: In residential PTSD treatment for girls, the environment has to be kind and nurturing. This is what a fully therapeutic setting does. It’s immersive and provides the level of care girls and assigned female at birth struggling with trauma need. Developing an environment that inspires personal growth and confidence is essential to the healing process.
  • Supportive Setting: Support is one of the most important components of successful PTSD treatment for girls. It’s not just about the staff being supportive, it’s the whole community–including the individual’s own family. There’s a system of support that needs to be built into the fabric of the program, otherwise the feeling of safety and warmth won’t be there.
  • Caring, Trained Staff: The staff need to be passionate about helping adolescents work through their issues and reach success. Alongside that, they also need to be appropriately trained to deal with situations that arise with struggling girls.
  • Comprehensive Therapy: The whole reason residential treatment exists is because traditional therapy alone wasn’t making much progress. To reach the best results in PTSD treatment for girls, many different therapies need to be utilized. No individual is the same, which is why a comprehensive therapeutic model accommodates to each girl’s specific needs. These therapies can be anything from EMDR therapy to equine therapy to family therapy to experiential therapy.
  • Relationship Building: Most girls and assigned female at birth struggling with a mental health issue also struggle with forming and maintaining relationships. They struggle with trusting others, opening up, and learning what a positive bond versus a negative bond looks like. Relationships are the foundation of our lives. Without a support system of family and friends, life can be pretty difficult. This is why it’s so important to include relationship building as an essential pillar in residential PTSD treatment for girls.

If you believe your child is having issues with trauma or other mental health challenges, it is critical to seek out a professional. Hoping the problem will remedy itself with time often does not turn out well–not just for your daughter, but for the whole family.

Solstice RTC is here for your daughter

Solstice RTC is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about our PTSD treatment for girls and assigned female at birth at Solstice RTC, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

teen technology use

Could Teen Technology Use Be the Next Big Drug?

Could Teen Technology Use Be the Next Big Drug? 2560 1707 Solstice RTC

The world we live in today involves massive amounts of technology. Few will argue that technology is the future. It’s how we communicate while on different continents. It’s how we tell our children we love them when we’re on a business trip. It’s how we record important moments in our lives through photos. It’s how we have access to more information than any physical library can ever offer. It’s also how out of control teen technology use came to be.

It’s essential for our children to know how to operate correctly, but that’s not how many use it. Many use the power of technology to engage in inappropriate behavior and even endanger themselves–this is when it becomes an issue.  

When teen technology use turns harmful

For starters, let’s celebrate something. The rate that teens, aged from 12 to 17, are smoking and drinking has been nearly cut in half in less than 15 years. That’s amazing and extremely good news.

Something not to celebrate is the rate of teen technology use. As substance abuse rates for teens have been going down, the use of technology has been exponentially going up. You may not think that’s an issue at first, but give me some time to explain.

Regular use of technology can absolutely be safe, useful, and life-enriching. Overuse can be the opposite. Just like anything else, too much of a good thing can be harmful. Think about it.

If your teen is so obsessed with their device that they’re willing to risk their life–and the life of others–just to check who liked their photo on Instagram, there’s a problem. It can cause more than just risky driving, though. It’s becoming more apparent that technology has the power to increase isolating tendencies and addictive behavior towards technology.

The only way to describe what some teens are going through is “addictive.” Some studies have shown that when teens get notifications on their devices–such as a “like” on Facebook–it triggers dopamine to be released, producing a similar effect to being high. This is how teen technology use can get out of hand.

When a teenager is already prone to rash decisions and no self-control, social media and devices can just exhaust this type of behavior. Many teens even sleep with their devices right next to them.

Inappropriate or excessive teen technology use can seriously get in the way of daily life, from making it difficult to discuss important issues with your teen to your teen getting panic attacks when separated from their devices. This is why teen technology use needs to be taken more critically than it currently is.

Solstice RTC is here for your daughter

Solstice RTC is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, inappropriate teen technology use, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we treat inappropriate teen technology use at Solstice RTC, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

residential treatment facility

Moving Forward at a Residential Treatment Facility for Teen Girls

Moving Forward at a Residential Treatment Facility for Teen Girls 2560 1707 Solstice RTC

When your child is struggling, it’s hard to know what to do among all the options available. The first try is usually traditional therapy. When this doesn’t result in improvement, many parents are lost on what to do. At this point, a residential treatment facility for teen girls and assigned female at birth may be the answer.

What is a residential treatment facility for teens?

A residential treatment facility is a specialized program that helps teens work through mental illness, substance abuse, and other behavioral issues. These facilities are specifically designed to deal with the issues of a certain age group. By temporarily living outside of their homes, teens in these treatment programs are able to be properly supervised and treated by professionals.

How does residential treatment differ from traditional therapy?

For a lot of struggling teens, traditional therapy is enough, but there’s a lot that need a step further. At a residential treatment program, your child is given a greater intervention that’ll help steer them in a healthier direction. Some of the aspects of a residential treatment center include:

Safe Environment. The point of these programs is to create a sanctuary where your child can make mistakes and work through issues. To do this, your child rarely has an unsupervised moment in order to provide the greatest safety.

Trained Staff. The staff in a residential treatment facility for teen girls and assigned female at birth are trained specifically to deal with the age and gender concentration of the program. These staff are thoroughly taught how to handle and subdue dangerous situations.

Comprehensive Therapy. In these programs, they use a combination of many different therapies in order to give your child the best treatment possible. This can include individual, group, family, equine, and many other therapies. Aside from that, when your child comes through the door, an individualized treatment plan is created to help your child through their own specific problems.

Solstice as a residential treatment facility for teen girls

Solstice RTC is a residential treatment center for teen girls, ages 14-18, struggling with issues such as trauma, depression, anxiety, and other behavioral issues. Through the use of many different therapeutic techniques, we strive to give our girls and assigned female at birth the most effective care we can provide.

To learn more about Solstice’s residential treatment facility for teen girls, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

 

trauma focused cbt

Beating Trauma with Trauma Focused CBT

Beating Trauma with Trauma Focused CBT 2560 1707 Solstice RTC

Trauma is a part of life. It comes in many different shapes and sizes, from national tragedies to personal hardships – and, whatever the cause, can leave a trail of pain in its wake. Trauma knows no age restrictions either: as a matter of fact, studies estimate that up to 43% of children experience trauma, with 3%-15% of girls and assigned female at birth consequently developing symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Trauma focused CBT is often utilized to help treat PTSD. 

If left untreated, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can cause a child to experience mood swings, become isolated, and constantly relive the experience. In extreme cases, it can even lead to severe problems such as substance use, dangerous behaviors, and poor school performance. As a parent of a child with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, it can sometimes be hard to know what to do. One moment, your child can seem normal; the next, they becomes a complete stranger. And, what’s worse, sometimes the origin of this trauma isn’t obvious. 

Fortunately, there is good news. Although Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can be difficult, there are ways to treat and overcome it. There are numerous approaches – all of which are available at residential treatment centers for trauma – including, among others, EMDR, neurofeedback, somatic experiencing, Trauma-Focused Equine Assisted Psychotherapy, and Trauma-Focused CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy).

Ways Trauma-Focused CBT Can Help Your Daughter

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is one of the most effective approaches at helping children who are coping with trauma. One of the benefits of Trauma Focused CBT is its unique focus on helping the entire family deal with the aftereffects of trauma. As a holistic approach, Trauma Focused CBT doesn’t merely attempt to cure the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; instead, its primary purpose is to help heal the mind, body, and spirit. Where only too many approaches are content with brushing the problem under the rug, Trauma Focused CBT centers on the underlying problem. By helping your child overcome the root of the problem, Trauma Focused CBT offers one of the most comprehensive solutions to dealing with trauma.

At the heart of Trauma Focused CBT is building an environment in which your child can feel safe. With the aid of the therapy, a child receives the necessary support to be able to discuss their traumatic experience. Openly talking about the issue allows therapists to guide the struggling children toward reevaluating the misconstrued beliefs that stem from the trauma.

Moreover, Trauma Focused CBT works in conjunction with the family. By utilizing a relationship-based approach (one that forms bonds between the child, the parent, and the therapist), Trauma Focused CBT allows a “therapeutic alliance” to be formed. The trust and respect shown on all sides of the balance are vital elements of the healing process both for the struggling child and for the adults affected by their children’s troubles.

It is also important to note that Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is more than a theoretical approach; in fact, it is a hands-on journey to a healthy future. The skills learned in Trauma Focused CBT last a lifetime.

Solstice RTC can help

If your teen girl is struggling with emotional or behavioral difficulties due to a trauma-related issue, Solstice can help their find success.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.