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emotional issues in teens

Parenting 101: Help for Emotional Issues in Teens

Parenting 101: Help for Emotional Issues in Teens 1866 2205 srtc_admin

The teenage years are tough. With hormonal changes, growing pains, and maturing relationships, being a teenager can be extremely overwhelming. You may feel like your teen is always on edge and perhaps “overly” emotional. You shouldn’t ignore these emotional waves. Instead, you should help your teen learn to cope with their emotions.

Let’s be honest. Sometimes it can feel like you cannot say anything right to your teen. Every question and comment can send them over the edge. They may feel like you’re being too nosey, too controlling, or overbearing. Finding a balance is tricky, because every teen responds differently. What works for one child may be a recipe for disaster for another. No one knows your child like you do, so you should first step back and address their own needs and what triggers their emotional outbursts.

Here are some things that can be sparking your teen’s emotional issues:

  • Peer pressure
  • Trouble fitting in
  • Relationship issues
  • Academic stress
  • Traumatic events
  • Self-confidence struggles

You should start a conversation with your teen and address their emotions head-on. Before you can create a way to improve their emotional state, you have to acknowledge the root of the issue.

A Few Helpful Reminders

Teenagers are oh so delicate. With this being said, the way you confront them is extremely important. Your approach determines the outcome or how they respond whether it be positive or negative.

Here are some things to keep in mind when trying to help for emotional issues in teens:

  1. Recognize that reactions are everything. If you treat the situation like it is a fire that needs to be put out, this will frighten teens and probably make the situation worse. When your teen is having a meltdown, you should step back, take a deep breath, and approach them calmly and reassure them that everything will settle.
  2. Be creative in helping them cope. Help your teen explore ways to release their emotions. Whether it be exercise, arts, crafts, or listening to music, encourage them to go to their safe space when they are feeling overwhelmed.
  3. Put things into perspective. Research shows the “glitter jar” to be a very effective model for teens to understand emotional distress. The main concept is that emotions “rise, swirl, and settle” by themselves with patience and care. Seeing a real-life model of this concept can be really beneficial for teens.
  4. Be attentive. Do not disregard your teen as overdramatic. This can make them feel neglected and crazy. Always over a listening ear. Be willing to give them advice and reassure them that emotions are normal. Ask what you can do to make things better. It is important that they know you care.

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls and assigned female at birth ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching teens how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

where to send a defiant teenager

Where to Send a Defiant Teenager: Why Residential Treatment Works

Where to Send a Defiant Teenager: Why Residential Treatment Works 6016 4016 srtc_admin

The teenage years are tough. Sometimes as a parent it can feel like you are in a constant power struggle with your teen. Hormonal changes can result in occasional defiant behavior and a lot of attitude. However, defiant behaviors have limits. When these limits are exceeded it may be time to make decisions about where to send a defiant teenager that will help your teen and your family as a whole. This can be a difficult decision to make as a parent, but you are not alone. Seeking professional help may be just what your child needs to get themselves back on track to a more successful future.

Your next thought may be: I don’t know where to send a defiant teenager. The answer may be a residential treatment center. Before you disregard the idea, you should learn more of what this type of treatment can do for teens.

Why Residential Treatment?

If you don’t know where to send a defiant teenager, a residential treatment center may be the best fit for your teen. You should not hesitate in seeking professional advice to offer resources to therapeutic programs as such. Residential treatment centers can be very beneficial for teens who struggle with defiant behavior. Here is how:

  • Residential treatment centers pull the individual from the chaos, distractions, and perhaps triggers that surround them in their everyday lives which helps them to focus on improving their behaviors.
  • The relationship-based approach within residential treatment allows your teen to work on relational struggles. This type of approach is helpful in giving your teen the skills they need to transition back to the relationships they have at home.
  • A holistic approach is taken through residential treatment. This basically means the teenager is addressed as a whole rather than simply identifying the issue or behavioral issue. The teen is able to look at themselves as a whole and work on self-improvement altogether.

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center is a program for teen girls and assigned female at birth ages 14-18 who struggle with issues related to anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching teens how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives using a wholistic approach. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and healthy. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345.

 

seasonal affective disorder in teens

Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens: Everything You Need to Know

Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens: Everything You Need to Know 5690 3808 srtc_admin

Seasonal Affective Disorder in teens is a type of depression that has a reoccurring seasonal pattern. This type of depression typically sets in during late fall or early winter. Seasonal Affective Disorder less commonly occurs in the spring and summer months. The diagnosis process for seasonal affective disorder is a long, specific process. The teen must meet the complete criteria for major depression that corresponds to specific seasons for a minimum of two years. If your teen is showing several signs of major depression you should seek professional help to determine the root of the issue.

Here are the signs of major depression:

    • Feeling depressed most of the day, nearly every day
    • Feeling hopeless or worthless
    • Low energy
    • Loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed
    • Sleep problems
    • Changes in appetite or weight
    • Feeling sluggish or agitated
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Frequent thoughts of death or suicide

The Seasonal Breakdown

Depending on the season, this disorder affects teens differently. While the winter is the most common season where the disorder is onset, summer seasonal affective disorder is possible too. Below are the distinctive symptoms that appear in the two seasons.

Winter Pattern of Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens:

  • Hypersomnia
  • Low energy
  • Weight gain
  • Craving of carbohydrates
  • Social withdrawal (desire to “hibernate”)

Summer Pattern of Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens:

  • Agitation
  • Restlessness
  • Anxiety
  • Episodes of violent behavior

Seasonal Affective Disorder Treatments for Teens

There are several treatment options for Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens. The best route to take should be determined by your child’s medical provider. In order to seek proper treatment, a professional evaluation is necessary. The most effective treatment will vary based off of the individual’s needs. Your teen’s doctor may decide to use one method only or two incorporated several at one time. Here are some treatment options:

  • Medication
  • Light therapy
  • Psychotherapy
  • Vitamin D

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls and assigned female at birth ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching teens how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and healthy. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

treatment for childhood trauma

Treatment for Childhood Trauma: Taking The Next Steps

Treatment for Childhood Trauma: Taking The Next Steps 4608 3456 srtc_admin

Did you know that “trauma” effects majority of children at some point in their lives? Studies show that 60 percent of children were exposed to trauma at least once during childhood. Trauma could encompass a variety of things including: violent events; sexual trauma; witnessing a trauma that caused or could have caused death or severe injury; learning about a traumatic event involving a loved one; and other traumas such as diagnosis with a serious illness, serious injury, or fire. Research proves that trauma is more common than previously thought. But how do we move forward from the struggles that childhood drama can bring? Below are some treatment options that may fit your child’s needs.

Immediate Actions

There are intervention methods you can practice immediately following a traumatic event that your child may have been exposed to. Here are the methods to consider:

  • Provide support so that the child and family feel safe and secure
  • Advocate a supportive role by caregivers and others
  • Maintain healthy relationships with the child’s primary caregivers and other close relatives/friends
  • Reduce unnecessary secondary exposures & separations
  • Help ease the child to return to typical routines (such as school) as soon as possible
  • Facilitate open but not forced communication with the child about his/her reactions to the traumatic event
  • Focus on constructive responses
  • Explain to child in developmentally appropriate terms
  • Encourage and support help-seeking behaviors
  • Create a supportive milieu for the spectrum of reactions and different courses of recovery
  • Monitor and/or refer child for a clinical trauma evaluation

Further Actions

You should never hesitate to seek professional help for your child. Seeking appropriate treatment for childhood trauma means doing your research and getting your child properly evaluated. In terms of treatment, here are a few things your health care provider may suggest:

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT): This type of therapy targets the symptoms that follow a child experiencing trauma. This is a limited-time type of intervention that typically lasts about 6 months. Research shows that TF-CBT has the ability to reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. The mission of this therapy is to teach children ways to cope with their emotions and to regulate their responses to traumatic memories in a healthier way.

Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS): Children spend most of their time during the day at school. The school setting has a critical responsibility of providing health and behavioral health services. This type of therapeutic intervention is the same as the therapy discussed above, it just happens in the school setting. For a child to overcome their trauma, it Is important that they feel safe and supported in the place that they spend most of their time.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT): This is a cognitive behavioral treatment approach that’s main objective is to blend behavior and problem-solving strategies with acceptance-based strategies. Here are the five components of DBT:

  1. Skills training
  2. Individual behavior treatment plans
  3. Access to therapist outside of clinical setting
  4. Structuring of their environment
  5. Therapist team consultation group

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls and assigned female at birth ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. This program is dedicated to teaching teens how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and healthy. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

depression in teens

Not Worth the Risk: Depression in Teens

Not Worth the Risk: Depression in Teens 5184 3456 srtc_admin

Depression often emerges in the adolescent years. These years are a critical developmental period. Research shows that depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. While causes vary depending on the affected individual early life stress, such as illness, family death, separation, or traumatic events can be risk factors of depression. The good news is there are ways to work towards building resilience towards depression. Helping your teen build this resilience now could help them overcome difficulties in their future.

Memories and Mental Health

Memories play a role in mental health. Happy memories could be the key to helping teens build resilience. Recalling past events has been proven to lift mood. Researchers took this knowledge and explored whether or not it could work to protect against stress in adolescents. The outcome proved that recalling happy memories helped decrease negative self-related thoughts. These types of thoughts are associated with depression. How cool is it to think that our teens have the tools to fight depression stored in their happy times?

How to Help

The best practices your teen will learn will come from home. That means it is your job to be a role model and a resource for them to seek out for advice and assistance. Before you can help, you should educate yourself on how you can be the best influencer. Here are some ways you can help reduce the risk of depression in your teen:

  • Encourage your child’s passions, keep them engaged in the activities they love.
  • Encourage exercise, exercise boosts mood and promotes healthy living.
  • Help them find ways to cope with stress.
  • Model healthy behaviors.
  • Maintain open lines of communication.
  • Enforce a regular sleep schedule.
  • Help them learn to use positive self-talk.

Solstice West Can Help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls and assigned female at birth ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, addictive behaviors, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. This approach will help students heal and improve from every angle. Fitness, nutrition, and academics also play an important role in this program as it teaches teens how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Solstice gives teens the skills and help they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, healthy, and capable of self-managing. We can help your family today!

 

childhood trauma

Hidden Brain: Ways Childhood Trauma Affects Us for Life

Hidden Brain: Ways Childhood Trauma Affects Us for Life 1280 853 srtc_admin

Whether you remember your childhood or not, it has shaped the person you are today. Good and bad experiences knit together to form the foundational basis for how you act, make decisions, and grow into adulthood. Childhood trauma can take a child’s future down a dark path if not properly recognized and treated.

New research has continued to strengthen the body of evidence that shows how damaging childhood trauma can be–even to the point of changing our children’s brain chemistry.

Study shows childhood trauma runs deep

Adult trauma is fairly different from adolescent or childhood trauma. As an adult, we’ve built certain coping mechanisms and techniques to deal with trauma–teens haven’t. While adults certainly feel the effects of PTSD and trauma, children experience it in a way that can actually change their brain chemistry.

The early years of life are the most transformatory. Our brains, bodies, values, and personalities develop during this period of time–but this also makes us incredibly exposed and vulnerable.

In a recent study by the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University in Montreal, Canada, researchers looked into how childhood trauma–such as abuse–can negatively affect mental health through impacting brain mechanisms.

It was discovered that adults who had experienced a childhood trauma had weaker and impaired neural connections in areas of the brain that deal with the regulation of attention, emotion, and other cognitive processes.

Other studies have shown decreased levels of white matter in certain parts of the brain when someone has gone through childhood trauma. White matter helps nerve cells “talk” to each other and communicate information. The volume of it can affect how efficiently someone is able to learn and make decisions.

The development of white matter largely happens during the early years, which is why the research team showed so much interest in how it may be affected by trauma.

They found a lower amount of connectivity between parts of the brain that regulate emotions and cognitive functioning. This helps explain why those who experience childhood trauma struggle in these areas.

Overall, these types of studies give us a deeper understanding of how childhood trauma impacts our future mental health. It highlights the importance to recognizing and treating trauma earlier rather than later in order to avoid negative outcomes–like difficulty with emotional regulation or a higher risk of substance abuse.

If you believe your child is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we treat childhood trauma at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

Father-Child Trip to Moab Brings Families Closer Together

Father-Child Trip to Moab Brings Families Closer Together 225 300 srtc_admin

What happened when seven boisterous dads & children joined with a team of creative & committed folks from Solstice RTC West and Aspect Adventure in Moab for a three day Father-Child Retreat this last September?  My Answer:  Nothing Short of Magic.

Not the Copperfield stuff nor the “warm fuzzy” of hallmark cards & commercials.  I’m talking about what happens when people committed to having a gritty-good experience, “come what may,” meet up with Mother Nature in a setting known for its beauty, challenges, and plentiful opportunities for fun & reflection.  Magic indeed – the kind I watched unfold before me – nearly moment by moment.  Not by accident or ease.  But. By. Choice.

Beginning with every bit of a 5 hour drive south, Erik Yost, Amanda and I (TjRowden) agreed that it was promising indeed when fathers and kiddos packed snuggly into two vehicles and nary once complained as we motored down the road.  I think there was only one time when the inevitable “are we there yet” was heard enroute.  After all, someone just had to say it to make it a bona fide road trip.  We laughed and spirits were high – even a little giddy – as we neared our destination in Moab.  A campsite near Fisher Towers.  And from that point on – we entered the very capable hands of Jason Blauch with Aspect Adventure.

With the help of “Camp Mom” Nick, it became very clear – their intention was to provide for our basic needs with such a degree of attention and service that our little group would be able to focus 110% on the reason we were there.  That was for dads & children to deepen their relationships through less talk, more action.  Not via “Disneyland dadding.”  As we discussed on day one – it was to be done via “side-by-side” experiences that would emerge over the course of the trip. Unscripted opportunities to lean-in to the relationship vs out.  Moments – privately and with the group – to choose courage over quitting, service over selfishness, responsiveness over resistance, healing over hurt.

And the lab for such opportunities?  One-on-one short hikes for fathers and daughters; a sixty+ foot climbing face and similar rappelling wall; thunder & lighting storms with fierce winds and rain (and even brief flooding of a desert creek near camp); double rainbows; blazing sunrises and sunsets; a hike near Fisher Towers; helping in the camp kitchen & with clean-up; night skies with stars that wouldn’t stop (inviting conversations that nearly didn’t either); and a fireside group where the vulnerability of dads and children alike was non-forced and – in a word – sacred.

Amidst anxieties, fears, and fatigue there was effort, courage, and compassion.  And in the face of a few “unexpecteds“ (i.e. weather, plans, emotions), I observed flexibility, determination, gratitude, support and many small choice points done well – very well.  After all, what is much of treatment, relationships, life if not learning to do hard things well.  If that was a measure of this trip –I was surrounded by giants.  Magic?  Yes indeed.  Because intention + action = magic.

 

teens refusing school

When Teens Refusing School Has More to Do with Anxiety Than Rebellion

When Teens Refusing School Has More to Do with Anxiety Than Rebellion 1280 853 srtc_admin

Teens refusing school isn’t exactly a new thing–ever since school began, teens have been trying to get out of it by feigning sickness or skipping class. But what about when the reason behind teens refusing school is more malignant than not wanting to sit through an hour and a half of Algebra?

When teens refusing school is a deeper issue

The difference between school refusal and other types of teen behavior has to do with the reason behind the behavior and the frequency.

Skipping class because they hate math isn’t school refusal. Pretending they’re sick once or twice to stay home and play video games isn’t school refusal.

Complaining about sudden physical symptoms right before school to stay home or regularly visiting the school nurse to get sent home are signs of school refusal, though. Especially if those symptoms tend to vanish pretty fast. If this happens often, there’s probably something more going on than simply not wanting to go to school.

School refusal itself isn’t a disorder, but a symptom of something bigger; this is usually anxiety-based. For younger kids, it’s usually about separation, but for older kids it may have more to do with the stress that’s attached to school.

I’m not just talking about homework. When kids transition from elementary to middle to high school, things can get complicated. Suddenly, there’s more homework, more responsibility, more social complexities, more expectations, more pressure–more everything. It can become overwhelming.

It’s simpler to believe that the only reason for teens refusing school is them “just being teenagers.” But the truth is more complex and difficult to deal with. It’s important for parents to be aware of the possibility of school refusal in order to help deal with it–otherwise, that anxiety can grow into something much more dangerous.

When you begin recognizing school refusal as a pattern, it’s important to ask your teen how they’re feeling and open up an objective path of communication. If they express feelings of helplessness or fear related to school, extra support could be helpful.

If you believe your child is struggling with anxiety or a different mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for guidance. There are options available to help your family.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help teens refusing school at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

College Prepared: Solstice Students Earn Higher Scores Across the Board

College Prepared: Solstice Students Earn Higher Scores Across the Board 1280 853 srtc_admin

At Solstice, education is a huge part of our programming. We understand that most of the girls and assigned female at birth that come in our doors are college-bound; therefore, we strive to provide them with excellent academic opportunities.

We’ve looked at the last five years of ACT scores from Solstice students and compared it to state and national averages–the results are astounding.

Solstice students score higher than state and national averages

We want our students to be able to graduate from Solstice and thrive out in the world.

For those with college in the future, we provide test preparation materials and classes for every student who seeks to take the SAT and/or the ACT. Our teachers work diligently and passionately to help students follow a structured academic plan that meets college admissions criteria.

Teachers aid girls and assigned female at birth in going through various possible colleges, understanding the application and essay writing process, and also give support for scholarships, financial aid, and community service.

It looks like all of our hard-work has paid off.

Our students at Solstice have surpassed state and national averages by enormous amounts. As you can see in the graph to the right, Solstice students scored nearly 75 percent higher on the ACT than the state average–they scored high above the national average as well.

Academic excellence at Solstice

For many of our students, school has become a place of struggle and negativity. We strive to create a traditional, challenging academic environment that can support our students emotional and learning needs. We want to transform the negativity into an excitement and hunger to learn more.

We’ve developed a program that can meet students where they are by having small class sizes, certified teachers, and individualized academic plans. Our academic program is fully intertwined with our clinical program which allows for a better overall treatment process.

If you believe your child may be struggling, it is critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance. There are options for your family.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

New Study Sheds Light on Help for Post-Traumatic Stress in Teens

New Study Sheds Light on Help for Post-Traumatic Stress in Teens 1280 853 srtc_admin

While help for post-traumatic stress in teens is becoming more accessible, there’s still much we don’t understand about the disorder and how it works.

In a new study, researchers believe they’ve discovered why some people develop PTSD and others don’t: molecular changes. There’s been research on how our genes and family history affect our chances of struggling with trauma, but these findings explore exactly why some people do or don’t suffer from symptoms of PTSD.

How our biology is possibly linked to issues with trauma

In a study conducted by researchers from the Netherlands, the participants were pulled from military personnel on deployment to a combat zone in Afghanistan.

help for post-traumatic stress in teensAccording to their findings, it seems that blood-based miRNAs could be biomarkers for symptoms of PTSD. This could offer help for post-traumatic stress in teens by giving a new way to screen for it.

MiRNAs are micro ribonucleic acids and play important roles in gene expression and regulation. Changes in miRNA levels have been linked to various problems, such as kidney disease, some cancers, and mental health issues. Researchers believe this means they could have something to do with PTSD.  

The lead author Dr. Laurence de Nijs from Maastricht University explains their findings:

“We identified over 900 different types of these small molecules. 40 of them were regulated differently in people who developed PTSD, whereas there were differences in 27 of the miRNAs in trauma-exposed individuals who did not develop PTSD.”

While de Nijs is optimistic about the results, he believes much more research has to be done in order to confirm their findings from this study.

Risk factors for developing PTSD

While one day we may be able to know exactly who needs help for post-traumatic stress in teens, we’re not quite there yet. In order to be aware if your child may be susceptible to PTSD, it’s important to know the risk factors.

Studies show that 6 to 30 percent (or even more) of trauma survivors end up developing PTSD, with youth being towards the high end of that percentage. Female and assigned female at births are also twice as likely to develop it compared to males.

Research-backed risk factors include:

  • Pre-existing emotional disorder (for example, those with depression are much more likely to develop PTSD compared to those without)
  • Drug or alcohol abuse
  • A family history of anxiety
  • A history of physical or sexual abuse, neglect, or abuse within the family
  • An early separation from parents
  • Lack of social support and/or poverty
  • Sleep disorders (insomnia, sleep apnea, etc.)

If you believe your child may be struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice offers help for post-traumatic stress in teens

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls and assigned female at birth often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage people with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about help for post-traumatic stress in teens at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.