• Residential Treatment Program for Teens 14-17

Depression

family relationships and depression

Close Family Relationships Protect Against Depression

Close Family Relationships Protect Against Depression 1707 2560 srtc_admin

We know that social support can be a buffer against feeling overwhelmed by stress and experiencing symptoms of depression. While we typically think of social support as having a close group of friends to vent to when problems arise, a recent study of more than 18,000 teenagers has found that positive family relationships are the most effective form of social support for teens with depression. This suggests that teens who feel isolated from their peers or who have been bullied at school are less likely to develop unhealthy relationships in adulthood if they have social support from their families growing up.

How Family Support Affects Mental Health

Secure attachment to family members set the foundation for all other social relationships, as teens learn that they can rely on others for their emotional and physical needs. Cohesive family relationships provide social support and resources that help teens manage the stresses of adolescence and open up conversations about personal problems and coping strategies. 

This cohort study conducted by the Carolina Population Center used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health that followed up with participants over 25 years. 

In this study, positive family relationships during adolescence were measured by:

  • Family Cohesion
  • Frequency of communication
  • Mutual understanding of emotions
  • Engaging in fun family activities together
  • Absence of parent-child conflict in the past month over the child’s behavior

What Constitutes Social Support?

Different types of relationships offer different types of support. Families play a unique role in their daughter’s support system by offering multiple types of support. 

  • Emotional Support involves physical comfort, listening and empathizing. Close friends offer hugs and to listen to your problems, letting you know that they’ve felt the same way, too. 
  • Esteem Support is shown through encouragement. People may point out your strengths or remind you that they care about you or that they believe in you. Close friends and mentors help build confidence when you’re feeling insecure.
  • Informational Support refers to advice-giving or gathering and sharing information that can help people know of potential next steps that may work well. They may either speak from personal experience or share suggestions they’ve heard from others. Professionals can answer a lot of questions you may have about the direction you want to take in life. 
  • Instrumental Support includes taking on responsibilities for someone else so they can deal with a problem or offering to help deal with whatever problems they’re struggling with. Someone who offers instrumental support may take care of you when you’re sick, help you brainstorm concrete solutions to problems, or offer financial assistance. 

The Lasting Effect of Secure Family Relationships

According to this study, family cohesion and the absence of parent-child conflict were associated with a lower risk of depression from adolescence into midlife. The reduction in depressive symptoms associated with positive adolescent family relationships was greater for females than males during adolescence and into the early 20s but then leveled out to be equally beneficial for males and females throughout young adulthood into midlife. 

While this study did not follow up on family cohesion over time, its results suggest that close relationships during adolescence have a lasting effect on levels of depression in adulthood. If your daughter’s depression has affected your family’s communication and connection, it is important to stay involved as part of her support system. Residential treatment centers, like Solstice RTC, believe that healing should be for the entire family, not just your daughter, as the most significant factor in creating positive long-term outcomes for children is parental involvement in the treatment process.

Solstice RTC Can Help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345.

family therapy for teens with depression

We are Family: Family Therapy for Teens with Depression

We are Family: Family Therapy for Teens with Depression 5758 3839 srtc_admin

When teens struggle with depression it can affect the whole family. In order for a family to give their teens the help and support they need—their own health needs to be a priority. This is why research says parents may benefit from treatment too. It is not uncommon for families to set their own issues aside to focus their energy on getting their teen better. However, this can be unhealthy and pose long-term negative effects

  1. Irritability coming from a depressed teen can cause conflict and alter family dynamics. 
  2. Negative thought patterns can become contagious and cause increased pessimism in the house. 
  3. Depressed teens may withdraw themselves from the family which hinders relationships. 
  4. Major responsibilities can shift. 
  5. A general burden of stress can grow in the household. 

These are the truths of how families can be impacted by depression. Family therapy for teens with depression is beneficial for more reasons than just “putting things back together”. This type of therapy creates an opportunity for families to reconnect and create a healthier environment for themselves. 

Family First Approach 

While having one’s family a part of their healing journey is important, the healing experience for the whole family unit is just as important. The process may not be easy, but it will be worth it. A family is like a team—you need everyone on the same page to effectively function. When everyone’s health and happiness is in check, the family dynamic is much stronger and well-equipped to support each other during challenging times. Family therapy has been proven a critical part of achieving long-term success for teens recovering from depression. Family therapy for teens with depression can work on confronting the following things:

  • Focus on healing damaged relationships 
  • Restore healthy connections within the family dynamic 
  • Create new healthy ways to cope with emotions 
  • Talk through one’s current struggles 
  • Establish lasting changes within the family 

Residential Treatment: Where does Family Fit?

Teens with depression can gain great benefits from enrolling in residential treatment. This allows them to remove themselves from their life and focus on healing from every angle with the help of professionals. The good news? Often times residential treatment programs strive to make the family a huge part of the healing process—not only their child’s healing but the family’s too. Don’t be afraid to reach out and seek resources to help your family as a whole. 

Contact Solstice RTC at 866-278-3345 

depressed teenage daughter

Facts About Your Depressed Teenage Daughter

Facts About Your Depressed Teenage Daughter 4104 2736 srtc_admin

The onset of depression occurs differently based on the individual. A new study even suggests that males and females develop depression differently. Depression is often characterized by low mood, loss of interest and pleasure, and major changes to sleep and appetite. However, it is not limited to these symptoms.  Some of the few differing factors between boys in girls include the following:

  • Young women are almost twice as likely as men to develop depression
  • Previous research has found similar rates of depression in both male and female genders prior to puberty—though some findings suggest boys may be slightly more likely than girls to experience depression.
  • Women will continue to have a higher likelihood of meeting the criteria for depression in their adult years.

If you have a depressed teenage daughter, it is important to note why she may experience depressive symptoms and the factors that contribute to the mental illness. Some things to consider are listed below.

  • One explanation for this difference is the earlier puberty in females compared to males. For instance, previous research has shown that early age of first menstrual cycle is associated with greater depressive symptoms.
  • This increased reactivity and stressor responsiveness in adolescent girls may result in greater anxiety and depressive symptoms.
  • Female adolescents—compared to male adolescents—experience not only a more rapid increase in depressive symptoms at an earlier age but also more depressive symptoms overall.

How To Help Your Depressed Teenage Daughter

Helpguide.org suggests three tips on how you can help your depressed teenage daughter cope with her symptoms and get the help she needs. Here’s what the source says:

    1. Encourage Social Interaction. Isolation makes depression worse. You should make communicating with your teen a priority. Set aside time each day to have one-on-one time with your teen. Make efforts to keep your teen connected with friends. Suggest that they get together with their friends or have their friends come over. Surrounding themselves with other kids is a good way to combat social isolation. Getting them involved in sports, clubs, or other activities is a great start to meeting new friends.
    2. Prioritize physical health. Physical and mental health are directly connected. Depression can worsen as a result of inactivity, poor nutrition, and lack of sleep. Establish a healthy and supportive environment at home to encourage your teen to make healthy choices. Get them moving by coming up with creative ways to encourage physical activity. Set limits on screen time and make sure you have expectations of when your teen should be unplugged from their device. Lastly, keep healthy food options available to them.
    3. Know when to seek professional help. This is perhaps the most important part. When your teen’s struggles extend beyond your realm of knowledge or beyond your ability to give them helpful advice. You should reach out to a professional to help guide your teen to a healthier and happier life. You should research the resources available around you and do not hesitate to reach out to professionals.

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

emotional issues in teens

Parenting 101: Help for Emotional Issues in Teens

Parenting 101: Help for Emotional Issues in Teens 1866 2205 srtc_admin

The teenage years are tough. With hormonal changes, growing pains, and maturing relationships, being a teenager can be extremely overwhelming. You may feel like your teen is always on edge and perhaps “overly” emotional. You shouldn’t ignore these emotional waves. Instead, you should help your teen learn to cope with their emotions.

Let’s be honest. Sometimes it can feel like you cannot say anything right to your teen. Every question and comment can send them over the edge. They may feel like you’re being too nosey, too controlling, or overbearing. Finding a balance is tricky, because every teen responds differently. What works for one child may be a recipe for disaster for another. No one knows your child like you do, so you should first step back and address their own needs and what triggers their emotional outbursts.

Here are some things that can be sparking your teen’s emotional issues:

  • Peer pressure
  • Trouble fitting in
  • Relationship issues
  • Academic stress
  • Traumatic events
  • Self-confidence struggles

You should start a conversation with your teen and address their emotions head-on. Before you can create a way to improve their emotional state, you have to acknowledge the root of the issue.

A Few Helpful Reminders

Teenagers are oh so delicate. With this being said, the way you confront them is extremely important. Your approach determines the outcome or how they respond whether it be positive or negative.

Here are some things to keep in mind when trying to help for emotional issues in teens:

  1. Recognize that reactions are everything. If you treat the situation like it is a fire that needs to be put out, this will frighten teens and probably make the situation worse. When your teen is having a meltdown, you should step back, take a deep breath, and approach them calmly and reassure them that everything will settle.
  2. Be creative in helping them cope. Help your teen explore ways to release their emotions. Whether it be exercise, arts, crafts, or listening to music, encourage them to go to their safe space when they are feeling overwhelmed.
  3. Put things into perspective. Research shows the “glitter jar” to be a very effective model for teens to understand emotional distress. The main concept is that emotions “rise, swirl, and settle” by themselves with patience and care. Seeing a real-life model of this concept can be really beneficial for teens.
  4. Be attentive. Do not disregard your teen as overdramatic. This can make them feel neglected and crazy. Always over a listening ear. Be willing to give them advice and reassure them that emotions are normal. Ask what you can do to make things better. It is important that they know you care.

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

Out of Control Teenager

Out of Control Teenager: What to Do to Gain Control Back

Out of Control Teenager: What to Do to Gain Control Back 0 0 srtc_admin

Parenting a teenager can often feel like a power struggle. Adolescence is a time in one’s life filled with hormonal changes, the pressure to fit it, and discover who one is. These kinds of factors can cause emotions to be at an all-time high and sometimes everything just seems to be your fault. As a parent, this can become overwhelming and stressful. When you feel on edge, it is critical that you do not act on your immediate feelings. This will end badly for everyone. Keep calm, take a breath, and know that there is hope for managing your out-of-control teenager.

An “out of control teenager” can fit the profile of many different types of situations. The following actions may indicate that your teenager fits this profile.

  • Experimenting with drugs and/or alcohol
  • Having violent outbursts towards family
  • Repeatedly running away
  • Threatening others
  • Stealing
  • Getting in legal trouble

Teenager Control: The Top 3

Once you identify troubling behavior in your teen, it is important that you address the situation immediately. Remember the way you react to these types of situations plays a large role in how they choose to react. If you do nothing, they will continue to be out of control. If you react in an angry outburst, they are likely to respond in an angry way as well. Remember the goal is to restore peace within your family, relieve tensions, and get your teen on track to a happy, healthy and successful life.

Here are 3 tips for helping your teen calm down:

  1. Lay down the law. Do not allow places in your expectations that are free for interpretation. You should set clear expectations and household rules for your teen to follow. With these expectations should come consequences when your child chooses not to follow your standards. If they are warned and well aware of the expectations pressed upon them, there is no room for argument later. Establishing boundaries is the first and most important step.
  2. Communicate calmly. You should initiate a conversation with your teen about their troubling behavior. Ask them why they are acting out. You should definitely come at this conversation as a concerned parent. Never assume. Investigate and confirm that there are no other personal struggles going on, with friends, peers, or elsewhere.
  3. Focus on follow through. Leaving room for leniency in your disciplinary efforts is a no go. By showing consistency with your ability to uphold the consequences you set in place, you are avoiding manipulation from your teen. They will learn that you are serious about your rules and that there is no bending them. While you want to be a superhero parent all the time, sometimes swooping in and saving your teen is not the best idea. When they learn from their actions, they will grow and improve going forward.

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a residential program for teen girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and healthy. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

seasonal affective disorder in teens

Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens: Everything You Need to Know

Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens: Everything You Need to Know 5690 3808 srtc_admin

Seasonal Affective Disorder in teens is a type of depression that has a reoccurring seasonal pattern. This type of depression typically sets in during late fall or early winter. Seasonal Affective Disorder less commonly occurs in the spring and summer months. The diagnosis process for seasonal affective disorder is a long, specific process. The teen must meet the complete criteria for major depression that corresponds to specific seasons for a minimum of two years. If your teen is showing several signs of major depression you should seek professional help to determine the root of the issue.

Here are the signs of major depression:

    • Feeling depressed most of the day, nearly every day
    • Feeling hopeless or worthless
    • Low energy
    • Loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed
    • Sleep problems
    • Changes in appetite or weight
    • Feeling sluggish or agitated
    • Difficulty concentrating
    • Frequent thoughts of death or suicide

The Seasonal Breakdown

Depending on the season, this disorder affects teens differently. While the winter is the most common season where the disorder is onset, summer seasonal affective disorder is possible too. Below are the distinctive symptoms that appear in the two seasons.

Winter Pattern of Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens:

  • Hypersomnia
  • Low energy
  • Weight gain
  • Craving of carbohydrates
  • Social withdrawal (desire to “hibernate”)

Summer Pattern of Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens:

  • Agitation
  • Restlessness
  • Anxiety
  • Episodes of violent behavior

Seasonal Affective Disorder Treatments for Teens

There are several treatment options for Seasonal Affective Disorder in Teens. The best route to take should be determined by your child’s medical provider. In order to seek proper treatment, a professional evaluation is necessary. The most effective treatment will vary based off of the individual’s needs. Your teen’s doctor may decide to use one method only or two incorporated several at one time. Here are some treatment options:

  • Medication
  • Light therapy
  • Psychotherapy
  • Vitamin D

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and healthy. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

depression in teens

Not Worth the Risk: Depression in Teens

Not Worth the Risk: Depression in Teens 5184 3456 srtc_admin

Depression often emerges in the adolescent years. These years are a critical developmental period. Research shows that depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. While causes vary depending on the affected individual early life stress, such as illness, family death, separation, or traumatic events can be risk factors of depression. The good news is there are ways to work towards building resilience towards depression. Helping your teen build this resilience now could help them overcome difficulties in their future.

Memories and Mental Health

Memories play a role in mental health. Happy memories could be the key to helping teens build resilience. Recalling past events has been proven to lift mood. Researchers took this knowledge and explored whether or not it could work to protect against stress in adolescents. The outcome proved that recalling happy memories helped decrease negative self-related thoughts. These types of thoughts are associated with depression. How cool is it to think that our teens have the tools to fight depression stored in their happy times?

How to Help

The best practices your teen will learn will come from home. That means it is your job to be a role model and a resource for them to seek out for advice and assistance. Before you can help, you should educate yourself on how you can be the best influencer. Here are some ways you can help reduce the risk of depression in your teen:

  • Encourage your child’s passions, keep them engaged in the activities they love.
  • Encourage exercise, exercise boosts mood and promotes healthy living.
  • Help them find ways to cope with stress.
  • Model healthy behaviors.
  • Maintain open lines of communication.
  • Enforce a regular sleep schedule.
  • Help them learn to use positive self-talk.

Solstice West Can Help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, addictive behaviors, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. This approach will help students heal and improve from every angle. Fitness, nutrition, and academics also play an important role in this program as it teaches young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Solstice gives young women the skills and help they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, healthy, and capable of self-managing. We can help your family today!

 

More Than Stretching: Benefits of Yoga Include Lowering Depression

More Than Stretching: Benefits of Yoga Include Lowering Depression 1280 853 Solstice RTC

Yoga–it’s become a huge trend, especially among those who love pumpkin spice lattes and leggings, but new research is showing that it’s much more than a trend. Benefits of yoga should now include reducing depression and anxiety.

I know what you’re thinking that it sounds absurd that yoga could treat symptoms of serious mental health issues, but I’m here to show you the research. Now, it’s not like you can only do yoga and cure your depression–but it seems that you can combine it with other treatment methods to keep your mental illness under control.

Benefits of yoga now include lowering depression symptoms

There’s been plenty of research confirming how yoga has the power to lower anxiety and stress symptoms–but now depression has been added to the list.

benefits of yogaIn research conducted by the American Psychological Association, it was found by overviewing many different studies that practicing yoga can lessen symptoms of depression. The type of yoga used was varied forms of hatha yoga (yoga that focuses on physical exercise), along with breathing and meditative exercises.

In one study, 23 male veterans took two yoga classes a week for eight weeks. The vast majority praised the classes and reported that they would recommend that other veterans do it. It was also found that those with high levels of depression had significant decreases after the eight weeks.

In another study, 52 women, ages 25 to 45, participated. Half of them partook in the same type of yoga in the last study and the other half were the control. Depression levels were recorded at the beginning, along with weeks three, six, and nine. They found the same results–symptoms of depression were largely decreased.

In yet another study showing the clear benefits of yoga, researchers measured how practicing yoga affected levels of depression, anxiety, rumination, and worry. They found that even four months after the treatment of yoga, participants had decreased levels across the board.

Dr. Lindsey Hopkins, one of the chairs in the session that overviewed research on yoga and mental health, explained what these results could mean:

“At this time, we can only recommend yoga as a complementary approach, likely most effective in conjunction with standard approaches delivered by a licensed therapist. Clearly, yoga is not a cure-all. However, based on empirical evidence, there seems to be a lot of potential.”

It’s obvious that the benefits of yoga cannot fully replace licensed therapy, but has the ability to work alongside the therapy and improve an individual’s overall treatment.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we use the benefits of yoga at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

 

Teen Depression Treatment Center: 4 Signs Your Daughter Needs Help

Teen Depression Treatment Center: 4 Signs Your Daughter Needs Help 1280 853 Solstice RTC

There’s regular sadness and angst–and then there’s depression. Depression is more than an episode of sadness; it causes a continuous feeling of unhappiness and loss of interest. It has the power to affect how you think, feel, and behave. As a parent, it’s hard to see when your daughter’s sadness has morphed into something that only a teen depression treatment center may be able handle.

When left ignored, depression can lead to various physical and emotional issues, making it all the more important to get help as early on as possible.

Recognizing whether your daughter needs help for depression

It can be difficult for a parent to discern between regular moodiness in a teen and depression. As a teen depression treatment center, we know what to watch for and have compiled a list of four red flags for parents trying to figure out whether their daughter is struggling with depression or not.

Length of sadness, hopelessness, or frustration

teen depression treatment centerIf depression goes untreated, it creates intense feelings of hopelessness, anger, and sadness that last for weeks, months, or even longer. A regular bad mood can last hours or a couple of days–not weeks, months, and longer. Depression can. If your daughter has been in this type of mood for more than a week, it may be time to start worrying.

Lack of interest in previously enjoyed activities

For a teen with depression, it can be hard to focus and make them feel as if they have no energy to go out and participate in things they usually enjoy. Depression can make an individual feel as if they can’t enjoy life. For example, let’s say your daughter has loved playing soccer since she was a little girl and suddenly she just doesn’t want to play anymore.

She doesn’t explain why really, but just shows a general lack of interest in it all. Especially if she’s starting to withdraw from friends, family, and social interaction overall, it could be a red flag. If this goes on for more than a few days, it could be a sign that your daughter may need help for depression.

Changed eating/sleeping patterns

This may sound odd at first, but depression manifests itself mentally and physically, which means it can mess with an individual’s appetite and sleep cycle. Depression could cause issues falling and staying asleep or sleeping much more than usual. It can also cause an individual to lose or gain a lot of weight.

Sudden drop in academic performance

When things start to go bad for a student mentally, academics are often the first to fall. Depression makes it hard to focus, exert effort, and care about the future–which means that school is probably the first place you’ll begin to see signs of a struggle.

If your child usually struggles in school, that’s a different story. But if they’ve generally done very well, sudden falling grades can be a huge warning sign that your child may need help from a teen depression treatment center.

Solstice is a teen depression treatment center

Solstice is a groundbreaking teen depression treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about our teen depression treatment center at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

emdr therapy

Beating Back the Monsters with EMDR Therapy

Beating Back the Monsters with EMDR Therapy 2560 1707 Solstice RTC

When something traumatic happens to you, sometimes it stays in your mind, vivid as the day it happened years later. It can manifest in dreams and reality, making life more difficult. Moving forward with trauma, anxiety, or depression can seem nearly impossible for some people. There’s hope, though. As more studies confirm its effectiveness, EMDR therapy has become a more accepted and used technique for those struggling with trauma, depression, or anxiety.

What is EMDR therapy?

EMDR stands for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, but that’s a mouthful so it’s referred to as EMDR therapy. It’s a psychotherapy that allows a person to rework through a disruptive life experience and alleviate the distress associated with it. Many studies have shown it to be extremely successful with not just single-trauma victims, but multi-trauma victims.

How does it work?

It’s fair to ask how moving your eyes back and forth can ease anxiety, depression, and trauma, but the truth is that researchers are still searching for a full explanation.

Some outcomes in studies have suggested that the eye movement mimics that of REM sleep, allowing the brain to fully process negative memories instead of having them stuck on repeat in the person’s mind. Though the true understanding is unknown, the evidence for the effectiveness of EMDR therapy is there in hard research. It’s hard to ignore something that can be so beneficial to so many suffering people. 

Solstice RTC is here to help

EMDR allows us to get past the verbal part of the traumatic memory and touch on imagery, body sensation, emotion, and negative core belief systems.  Without touching on these components of Trauma, it is difficult to redirect the acting out behavior that comes in response to a traumatic event.  It is amazing to witness the girls at Solstice move past memories that have become “stuck” and into a “functioning” memory.  Trauma no longer has to control their lives and they feel empowered to view their lives differently. – Kami Black, MSW, LCSW, Clinical Director and Primary Therapist at Solstice RTC

Solstice RTC is a residential treatment center for struggling young women, ages 14-18. Our program is engineered to help our girls work through issues, such as anxiety, depression, or trauma. We utilize many different therapeutic techniques, including EMDR therapy, to create a comprehensive treatment for each individual in our program.

For more information about Solstice RTC, please call (866) 278-3345 today!