• Residential Treatment Program for Teens 14-17

Mental Health

Snapchat Addiction: The Darkside of a Popular Worldwide App

Snapchat Addiction: The Darkside of a Popular Worldwide App 1280 853 Solstice RTC

Snapchat is just about on every teenager’s smartphone. It’s one of the most used apps in the world, competing with other major companies like Instagram and Facebook. A downside has begun to become apparent, though, as this app continues to increase in popularity: Snapchat addiction.

This may be the moment that you chuckle, but I guarantee this is real. Technology addictions are getting more serious attention lately–and Snapchat addiction needs to be included in that enhanced awareness.

Why a Snapchat addiction should be taken seriously

To understand why Snapchat addiction should be taken seriously, you have to understand why technology addictions are very real. Addictions aren’t just reserved for substances–really you can become addicted to most things that light up the reward system in the brain.

Take gambling addictions for example; people become addicted to the feeling, the rush, of winning money. With technology, it’s similar. For video game addictions, it’s usually being used as a sort of escape from reality. For a Snapchat addiction, it’s more about views and “snap streaks.”

If you’re like me, you have no clue what a snap streak is. Snapchat is usually reserved for individuals under the age of 30, which means parents often have no clue as to how it works.

snapchat addictionSnap streaks are the way to measure “success” on Snapchat. On Instagram it’s about likes, on Snapchat it’s about the streak. A snap streak is when you’ve been sending snaps directly to a person for a prolonged amount of time. To get the streak, you have to do it each day, though–so if you miss a day, you lose the streak.

This all sounds pretty trivial to parents, but for some teens it’s everything.

For some teens, it’s a measure of how much you care about someone or how much they care for you. If you’re good friends, they’re more motivated to keep the streak going; if you’re not, they’ll let it die without mourning.

It can get so obsessive that the streaks continue for over a year–and if you lose one, it can be devastating, it can even ruin a friendship. So, it’s easy to see how this obsession to grow into something problematic.

It can begin as something harmless, but if behavior increasingly becomes erratic and obsessive based around Snapchat, there may be a real issue. When a teen begins to place their self worth on the number of likes, followers, or snaps they receive, it’s a recipe for disaster.

Snapchat ranked among worst social media for mental health

In a study conducted by Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) and the Young Health Movement (YHM), researchers found that Instagram and Snapchat are the worst for mental health in teens.

The data came from 1,500 youth, ages 14-24, in order to understand social media’s impact on the age group that uses it the most.

The researchers believe this is because the two platforms are largely based on image rather than anything else. It all focuses on followers and shallow status factors. Having your self esteem based on something so volatile and superficial can lead to serious mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, extreme feelings of loneliness, and more.

Solstice is a teen depression treatment center

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, Snapchat addiction, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help with Snapchat addiction at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

transitioning from wilderness programs

Back to School Tips & How We Help Our Students Thrive

Back to School Tips & How We Help Our Students Thrive 5976 3992 Solstice RTC

Transitioning back to school after a lengthy, relaxed, thrilling summer vacation is easy for some students–but for others, it’s painful and often creates unnecessary struggle throughout the rest of the school year.

Especially if your daughter grapples with anxiety or depression, going back to school can be an instigator for those issues. We have some advice that could possibly help in guiding your daughter back into school more smoothly.

Time management & organization are top challenges to going back to school

When girls struggling academically come to us, many of their issues often lay in an inability to manage their time and stay organized. Without these skills, your daughter can easily find herself just two weeks into school already missing assignments left and right, already dealing with an epic amount of anxiety, and already ready to give up.

back to school

Solstice, Layton, Utah, September 8, 2016.

This isn’t necessarily because she’s “lazy” or doesn’t care about school–much of the time it’s because she doesn’t know how to handle these responsibilities correctly.

A critical–yet sometimes tedious–part of time management and organization is maintaining a planner. I know, it sounds too simple and obvious–but most teens don’t keep a planner. When your daughter goes back to school, start off her organization strong.

She needs to write down every assignment, every exam, every thing that pertains to the gradebook. With this, she can make a to-do list easily. She can look at her planner and be reminded exactly when that project she’s already forgotten about is due.

Now, that’s organization, but time management is essential to staying organized. Your daughter can have all of her homework assignments, projects, meetings, and exams written down in her planner, but if she doesn’t know how long they’ll take, it’s hard to know when the best time to complete them is.

We often have our girls actually ask the teacher how long an assignment or project will take them, then they’ll record that along with the date it’s due in their planner. When they don’t do this, many often end up spending much longer than they need to on assignments.

If she can complete something in 15 minutes and get an A, she shouldn’t be spending an hour on it. That’s 45 minutes she could’ve spent getting something else done. By managing her time, she’s able to get things done more quickly and have the time to relax, take a breath, and control her anxiety.

How we help our girls become successful students

Many of our students have learning differences and, for many of them, school has become a place of hardship and anxiety. We help create individual goals and milestones for each individual–because no student is the same.

Our special education program, while nurturing and specific, is also very rigorous. It’s important for parents to know that putting their daughter into treatment doesn’t mean they have to give up their academics. Our girls eventually return to public school, private school, college, or even a job, so it’s critical for us to be able to keep that growth going.

Around 60 percent of our girls score higher on math and science than the national average–this is because our program is built to not only support our students, but also push them so they can reach their full potential.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Dealing with these issues can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

Too Much to Handle Alone: Where to Send a Defiant Teenager

Too Much to Handle Alone: Where to Send a Defiant Teenager 1280 853 Solstice RTC

If you’ve been struggling with your daughter to the point of it disrupting her daily life, you may be thinking, “I have no clue where to send a defiant teenager.” You’re not alone. That’s generally what every parent in your position is thinking–and that’s because no parenting book or meeting prepared you for this situation.

If you’ve already gone through traditional therapy and haven’t made much progress, it may be time to look into more intensive and alternative options. Residential treatment centers (RTC) are one of those options. These are places where your daughter can get the space and attention to truly work through the issues she’s been facing.

Why an RTC is where to send a defiant teenager

Comprehensive Therapy

At an RTC like Solstice, many types of therapies are built into the fabric of the programming in order to create a more holistic approach to treatment. This makes sure that your child is able to receive treatment in all her individual areas of struggle.

It also allows her to find the most effective and beneficial treatment for her specific needs. The types of therapy used can include equine therapy, group therapy, individual therapy, family therapy, and many others.

where to send defiant teenager24/7  Therapeutic Experience

In traditional therapy, therapists don’t usually get to see how their clients apply their sessions after they leave the office. In addition, the client isn’t typically able to apply what they learned in a safe, therapeutic environment.

Not only is your child being cared for 24/7, but she’s experiencing a complete, intensive therapeutic experience. In a residential treatment center for teens, your daughter gets the full benefits a therapeutically integrative and intensive experience.

Making Mistakes in a Safe Environment

To move forward and work through her issues, your daughter needs to be able to make mistakes in a safe, nurturing setting that will give her the proper feedback to grow. She’s able to do this in a residential treatment center for teens. The environment is specifically designed to do this through secure facilities and trained staff.

Bringing Skills Back Home

An RTC understands that you want your daughter to be able to continue to reach her potential and succeed once she moves on from the program. To do this, residential treatment centers focus on building and strengthening skills that will be useful for your daughter throughout her life–not just in the program.

When thinking where to send a defiant teenager, RTCs should be at the top of your list if your daughter is struggling.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. When trying to find where to send a defiant teenager, things can get confusing and overwhelming fast–but we’re here to help guide you.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

If you’re searching for where to send a defiant teenager, we may be able to help at Solstice. Please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

10-Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation Can Improve Anxiety

10-Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation Can Improve Anxiety 1280 854 Solstice RTC

Anxiety is not uncommon for teenagers. Between friends, exams, homework, extracurriculars, and keeping your GPA up, life can get pretty stressful. Sometimes it gets so stressful that it starts to form unhealthy habits and underlying mental health issues–but studies are showing that there may be something that could help: mindfulness meditation.

I know what you’re thinking, “Meditation is going to fix my child’s anxiety?” No, that’s not what I’m saying. Mindfulness meditation has been shown to improve symptoms of anxiety and depression, making it a good tool to maintain mental health and act as a helper–not the only treatment.

Just 10-minutes of mindfulness meditation could help

The University of Waterloo recently conducted a study that showed how powerful mindfulness meditation can be. With over 80 individuals that struggle with anxiety, the researchers discovered that using mindfulness meditation reduced one of the most common symptoms of anxiety: repetitive, off-task thinking.

mindfulness meditationThe best part? It was only 10-minutes once a day. With just a few minutes out of the day, anxious individuals found improvements in their mind’s tendency to wander and overthink things. For people with anxiety, this can be one of the main things that disrupts their day. While it’s normal for the mind to wander, when it’s almost impossible to make it focus at times, that’s an issue.

Mindfulness meditation isn’t just about sitting in one place for 10-minutes. It’s about taking a moment to pull yourself out of your internal worries and focusing–without judgement–on how you’re feeling now and taking note of what’s around you in the current moment.

One of the researchers, Mengran Xu, discussed why the results are important:

“Our results indicate that mindfulness training may have protective effects on mind wandering for anxious individuals. We also found that meditation practice appears to help anxious people to shift their attention from their own internal worries to the present-moment external world, which enables better focus on a task at hand.”

Mindfulness meditation obviously has a lot of potential in the mental health fields. It’s a tactic that you can use nearly anywhere and almost anyone can master it.

If you believe your daughter is struggling with a mental health issue, it’s critical to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, issues with bullying, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we use mindfulness meditation at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

Self Identity in Teens: Social Media Is Getting in the Way

Self Identity in Teens: Social Media Is Getting in the Way 1280 854 Solstice RTC

The shaping of self identity in teens is one of the most important and most vulnerable processes of our lives. The self identity that we build during the adolescent years follows us into adulthood, which makes it an extremely critical period of time. Social media could be negatively affecting it, though.

We live in a world where nearly every teenager has access to social media, whether it’s through their own device, a friend’s, or a shared one at home. This level of connectivity has opened many doors in the way of communication, but it has also brought about questions of the negative impact it can have on forming minds.

Social media can negatively impact young girls

self identity in teensSocial media is largely based on looks. We already know that the images and expectations depicted by the media can be incredibly harmful on a young girl’s forming mind, social media just makes it easier to pass along those messages.

While social media is an inspirational and revolutionary means of connecting with others, focusing on appearances is never good for a girl’s mental health–and that’s exactly what social media tends to focus on and “reward” with likes.

Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook (just to name a few) are among the most used social media platforms by adolescents, and they all heavily rely on the approval of others through “likes” and comments.

If self identity in teens is based on how many “likes” you receive on a post, then there’s always going to be someone who has more, and for that person, there’s always going to be someone who has more, and so on. It’s a vicious cycle that makes absolutely no sense.

Many teen girls strive to get the coolest and most perfect photos just for their online presence to appear “active” and “fun”–even if they’re not actually having fun in real life. This type of behavior and thinking can lead to mental health issues like depression or anxiety.

Self identity in teens needs to be nourished and built by more than just “likes” and shares on social media. As parents, it’s our job to step in and offer support if we notice our child isn’t basing their self-worth on things that truly matter.

If you believe your daughter truly is struggling, it’s imperative to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, issues with self identity in teens, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help self identity in teens at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

Beating Back the Monsters with EMDR Therapy

Beating Back the Monsters with EMDR Therapy 150 150 Solstice RTC

When something traumatic happens to you, sometimes it stays in your mind, vivid as the day it happened years later. It can manifest in dreams and reality, making life more difficult. Moving forward with trauma, anxiety, or depression can seem nearly impossible for some people. There’s hope, though. As more studies confirm its effectiveness, EMDR therapy has become a more accepted and used technique for those struggling with trauma, depression, or anxiety.

What is EMDR therapy?

EMDR stands for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing, but that’s a mouthful so it’s referred to as EMDR therapy. It’s a psychotherapy that allows a person to rework through a disruptive life experience and alleviate the distress associated with it. Many studies have shown it to be extremely successful with not just single-trauma victims, but multi-trauma victims. 

How does it work?

It’s fair to ask how moving your eyes back and forth can ease anxiety, depression, and trauma, but the truth is that researchers are still searching for a full explanation.

Some outcomes in studies have suggested that the eye movement mimics that of REM sleep, allowing the brain to fully process negative memories instead of having them stuck on repeat in the person’s mind. Though the true understanding is unknown, the evidence for the effectiveness of EMDR therapy is there in hard research. It’s hard to ignore something that can be so beneficial to so many suffering people. 

Solstice RTC is here to help

EMDR allows us to get past the verbal part of the traumatic memory and touch on imagery, body sensation, emotion, and negative core belief systems.  Without touching on these components of Trauma, it is difficult to redirect the acting out behavior that comes in response to a traumatic event.  It is amazing to witness the girls at Solstice move past memories that have become “stuck” and into a “functioning” memory.  Trauma no longer has to control their lives and they feel empowered to view their lives differently. – Kami Black, MSW, LCSW, Clinical Director and Primary Therapist at Solstice RTC

Solstice RTC is a residential treatment center for struggling young women, ages 14-18. Our program is engineered to help our girls work through issues, such as anxiety, depression, or trauma. We utilize many different therapeutic techniques, including EMDR therapy, to create a comprehensive treatment for each individual in our program.

For more information about Solstice RTC, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Putting the Pieces Back Together: Helping Your Daughter through the Effects of Trauma in Teens

Putting the Pieces Back Together: Helping Your Daughter through the Effects of Trauma in Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

As far as adults are concerned, childhood is the best time of a person’s life. Unfortunately, for a large number of teens, that is not the case. For some, the culprit is simply puberty. For up to 43% of children, however, the issue is more serious – 15%-43% of girls experience trauma, with a further 3%-15% developing symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The effects of trauma in teens can be dramatic and harsh.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is one of the most extreme effects of trauma in teens; however, there are many effects of trauma in teens that could potentially develop. Perhaps one of the most important things to note is the fact that the effects of trauma in teens are as “real” as that of a veteran following a war. All trauma is different and there is no one-size-fits-all approach to curing the effects of trauma in teens. It is also important to note that trauma can take a number of forms – from personal tragedies to national disasters. There is no trauma that is too small to cause a problem.

Recognizing the Effects of Trauma in Teens

As a parent of a child suffering the effects of trauma in teens, the first step to making the problem better, is to recognize it exists. Often, parents find it difficult to admit that their child is struggling with a mental issue. In order to begin the healing process, though, it is vital that these effects addressed. 

The effects of trauma in teens can vary in severity. In virtually all cases, though, trauma in teens combine both the effects of trauma in younger children with those of adults. In other words, teenagers get the worst of both worlds. Typically, the effects of trauma in teens include fear, anger, withdrawal, and isolation. Suffering from trauma may cause your child to exhibit reckless and dangerous behaviors. Depression, hopelessness, and flawed reconstruction of memories can also be a consequence of trauma.

Ways to Help Your Child Overcome the Effects of Trauma in Teens

If you see signs of trauma in your child, the sooner you get help, the better. If left untreated, the effects of trauma in teens can linger and cause problems all the way into adulthood. Some tips to remember include:

  • Listen. Opening lines of communication with your struggling child will allow you to support them through this difficult time. If your child feels safe approaching you to discuss the problem, you will be better-equipped to help it.
  • Don’t judge. Trauma doesn’t even have to be experienced personally. While marital problems in someone else’s family may not seem serious to you, they may be devastating for your child.
  • Stay positive. Showing your child that you are worried only makes the effects of trauma in teens worse.
  • Keep a routine. Trauma may cause a child to lose appetite or sleep. Staying healthy is key to preventing the effects of trauma in teens from taking over.
  • Consider professional help. It may be difficult for symptoms to go away on their own. If your child exhibits the effects of trauma in teens, it could be time to contact a professional.

Solstice RTC can help

Solstice RTC, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling daughter find success.

For more information about Solstice RTC, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Working Through Emotional Struggles in Teens

Working Through Emotional Struggles in Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

Ah, puberty. The time when every problem seems like the end of the world. And the time when a child begins discovering their individuality. Unfortunately, growing up is never easy – not for the child, and especially not for the parent. With puberty often come disagreements, difficult days, and moments when your child can be downright cruel.

On the other hand, puberty is the time when your child slowly morphs into their adult self. This transitional period shapes who your child will be; with this in mind, it is extremely important for the parent to be available even if (when) the going gets tough. While it may occasionally be tempting to give up, there are several tips to help deal with the emotional struggles in teens.

Signs of Emotional Struggles in Teens

There are many outward signs of emotional struggles in teens. While no two cases are the same and the emotional struggles in teens can vary from person to person, several typical patterns frequently emerge. Some teens may express anger or sadness. Mood swings and rapid changes in appearance or friend groups could be indicators of inner turmoil. Also, many teens are tempted to try alcohol or drugs, especially as a response to stress. The first step to recognizing emotional struggles in teens is to educate yourself to the form they may take in your child. 

emotional struggles in teens

Image source: Flickr user- tree_leaf_clover

Another thing to keep in mind is that the teenage brain is different from the brain of an adult. Recklessness, for instance, is a natural part of development – with the problem potentially worsened by the presence of emotional struggles in teens. Emotional struggles in teens are not a reflection of the parent; they are, in most cases, simply a phase.

When dealing with emotional struggles in teens, remember to:

  • Watch for substance use and mental illness. Much of the time, emotional struggles in teens will pass with age. However, in some cases, emotional struggles in teens mask a deeper issue. If your child’s behavior lasts for extended periods of time or you suspect your child is using drugs or drinking alcohol, it may be time to consider professional assistance.
  • Set an example. As much as teenagers would hate to admit it, they look up to the parents. By being a role model, you encourage your teen to try to emulate your actions – just make sure not to set impossible expectations!
  • Listen. Opening up lines of communication with your child will allow them to approach you when they need help. Emotional struggles in teens can be lonely; if you are there for your teen when they need you, they are more likely to share their feelings in the future.
  • Have fun together. Often, parents forget that their children have interests that may differ from their own. Bonding over an activity that is fun for both you and your child will allow you to gently guide your child onto a healthy path.
  • Stay positive. While parenting a teen may hurt, in the end, keeping a good attitude is crucial to helping your teen become a well-adjusted adult.

Solstice RTC can help

Solstice RTC, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling daughter find success.

For more information about Solstice RTC, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Building Confidence: Fun Self Esteem Activities for Teens

Building Confidence: Fun Self Esteem Activities for Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

In today’s electronic-centered world, teens encounter one impossible standard after another. What’s worse, while back in the day there was simple reflection time without the intrusion of a screen, today the constant bombardment of information is seemingly inescapable. Between not having truly private moments and trying to live up to what the media glamorizes, it is no surprise that kids of today have more difficulty than ever building a positive image of themselves. Fortunately, as a parent, there are numerous self-esteem activities for teens that can help set them back on track.

Ideas for Self Esteem Activities for Teens

The most important thing to remember when exploring new self esteem activities for teens, is that it’s about your child. Moreover, it may require you several attempts to find the activities your teen enjoys, as opposed to the ones you think your teen will enjoy. Another thing to keep in mind, is that positive self-esteem activities for teens begin at home: no matter how much character you build doing various tasks, at the end of the day, encouraging your child and letting them know they are special the way they are will build a foundation for their self-esteem.  

Some fun self-esteem activities for teens can include ones that allow them to test their individuality or learn to rely on themselves. Part of building self-esteem and confidence is leaving the comfort zone – but not too far at first. Physical activities, such as sports or hiking, can be a healthy way to make your child feel empowered. Encouraging your kids to try themselves at various forms of artistic expression – many schools offer extracurricular activities to that end – may help them discover a hidden talent or passion. In the end, remind your children that nobody is an expert at first; learning to do new things is half the experience.

Solstice can help

Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter find success. Solstice helps girls struggling with behavioral and emotional difficulties such as self esteem issues, depression, anxiety, and trauma. For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Instant Gratification Times 1000: Teaching Your Teen Impulse Control

Instant Gratification Times 1000: Teaching Your Teen Impulse Control 150 150 Solstice RTC

Sometimes it seems that teens have the impulse control of a, well, teenager. One moment, they seem like rational human beings and then they do something so incredibly reckless, you cannot help but wonder what they were thinking. Fortunately, there’s a scientific answer: it’s all about the brain.

Educating Your Teen about Impulse Control

The teenage brain is still in the process of developing. This process not only leads to teenagers pushing boundaries and searching for individuality; it promotes risk-taking behaviors with little regard for consequence. The behaviors can range from mood issues resulting in confrontation and “borrowing” without asking, to substance abuse, kleptomania, compulsive sexuality, and many others.

As a parent of a teen with impulse control issues, there are several steps that you can take to make the problem easier. Typically, impulse control comes with age; however, a few tips can help relieve tension until that time comes. The most important thing to remember is to stay positive. As with many other situations, by losing your temper, you only add fuel to the fire; what could have been a calm discussion turns into a power struggle. 

Try to keep communication open. While it may be tempting for a parent to simply lay down the law, a real conversation is a two-way street. Setting a strict system of cause-and-effect (break the rules, deal with the consequences) does not teach your child why impulse control is important; sitting down and talking about the effect of recklessness does. Even though there are situations when remaining patient can prove difficult, in the end, the best way to teach your child impulse control is to exhibit impulse control yourself.

In some cases, impulse control issues may be symptoms of a deeper problem such as ADHD or anxiety. If your teen exhibits behaviors that could point to something else or your teen’s impulse control issues are getting out of hand, it may be time to consider professional help.

Solstice can help

If your teen is struggling with controlling their impulsive behavior, Solstice can help. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral issues like defiance, ADHD, substance use, and trauma.

For more information about how Solstice can help your teen, please call (866) 278-3345 today!