• Residential Treatment Program for Teens 14-17

Social Struggles

peer pressure

How To Deal With Peer Pressure: Ways to Help Your Teen

How To Deal With Peer Pressure: Ways to Help Your Teen 2560 1437 Solstice RTC

As our children hit their adolescent years, most parents begin to see a shift. Teens begin to gain more independence and they start to place more and more value on peer relationships. Because their friendships are so important to teens, peer pressure can become a very big issue during this time. Teens can become influenced by their peer circles positively, but there can also be a negative side as well.

Teen peer pressure can be dangerous

The pressure teens face from their peers can lead them into unhealthy behaviors, such as substance abuse and speeding. This is mainly because teen brains take more pleasure in social acceptance than adult brains. Because of this, teens are more likely to succumb to the pressure put on them by their peers.

According to a study conducted by the University of Michigan, teens might feel the effects of peer pressure more intensely from their close friends, as opposed to a group of their peers, because they care about them and value their opinions. Pressures from a best friend can feel more forceful and intimate than that from a larger group.  For example, if a teenage girl’s best friend started drinking because she has joined a new social group, she might have a hard time saying no if her friend pressures her to have a drink. She might not want to lose her best friend to this new group of friends. If she has this fear, it is likely she will drink.

It is important for parents to get to know their teen’s friends, and understand what motivates your teen’s relationships. If you find that your daughter is spending a lot of time with a friend who is making poor choices, you have already established a dynamic where you can talk with your teen about what is going on. You can ask her if she has any concerns about her friends and give her the opportunity to problem solve with your support. 

The positive side of teen peer pressure

Peer pressure also has a positive connotation, as teen girls might be influenced by their peers to do positive activities, such as joining a new club or helping out in the community. These new activities that can assist in building strong pathways in the brain.

As described in the article, “Teens and Decision Making: What Brain Science Reveals,” neural connections that are weak or not used very often are removed during the teen years through a process called synaptic pruning, which allows the brain to redirect valuable resources toward more active parts of the brain. Because of this, teens can, through new choices and behaviors, shape their own brain development. Through peer pressure, teens are often encouraged to engage in skill-building activities, such as sports or debate, that can not only provide challenges that stimulate the brain, but can also build stronger pathways within the brain, leading to greater academic success for the future.

Solstice RTC can help

The effects of peer pressure, although sometimes positive, can be damaging to your teen’s self esteem and daily habits. If your teen has fallen into negative activities due to peer pressure, such as substance abuse, Solstice can help. With our specialized, clinically intensive residential treatment program, we can provide your teen girl with the help she needs to overcome peer pressure and begin her path toward healing.

For more information, please call us at (866) 278-3345.

social anxiety in teens

A silent fear: Recognizing social anxiety in teens

A silent fear: Recognizing social anxiety in teens 2560 1709 Solstice RTC

Have you noticed that your teen avoids social situations? Maybe they skip school dances or avoid any group activities after school? We tend to label those teens as “just shy”, but the reality is, there might be a bigger issue happening. If your teen feels an overwhelming amount of stress around social interactions, they may be struggling with social anxiety.

Signs of social anxiety in teens

Social anxiety is an intense, persistent fear of being watched and judged by others. It can affect teens at home, school, and their other day-to-day activities. It can even make it hard to make and keep friends. Teens with social anxiety may worry about something like a class presentation for weeks in advance. They may even avoid places or events where they believe they might do something that will embarrass them. 

Signs and symptoms of social anxiety in teens to be aware of:

  • Difficulty speaking, shaky voice
  • Rapid heart beat
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Feeling dizzy or faint
  • Fear and avoidance of social situations
  • Extreme fear of being thought foolish by others, even with an understanding that the fear is unreasonable
  • Dread of social events that begins days or weeks in advance
  • Severe test anxiety
  • Irritability or anger before a social event
  • Hyper-sensitivity to criticism
  • Poor school performance

How To Help Your Teen With Social Anxiety

Not only do teens dealing with social anxiety suffer from the symptoms associated with the disorder, they also must overcome the consequences of their anxiety. Teens with social anxiety don’t participate in class, they are afraid to ask their teacher questions, and have trouble working on group assignments. Because of this, they struggle in school. If social anxiety is left untreated, it leaves teens at risk to develop other mental health issues such as depression, eating disorders, and suicidal ideation. It’s important to get your teen with social anxiety help as soon as you recognize what they are dealing with.

If your teen is struggling with social anxiety, you need to get them help as soon as possible. There are several ways you can help your teen work through their social anxiety. These include:

  • Teaching them breathing control: Breathing exercises are a proven way to reduce stress and help an individual calm down in situations that cause anxiety.
  • Change lifestyle habits: Cutting out caffeine and sugar can help your teen reduce anxiety. Also, make sure they are getting enough sleep at night. This may not be enough to help overcome social anxiety, but it helps with the overall healing process.
  • Help them face their fears: By introducing them gradually to social situations, your teen will begin feeling more comfortable around people. Start by having them accompany a friend to a small gathering and work up from there.

Further treatment at Solstice RTC

If your teen is struggling with social anxiety, consider getting help from Solstice. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teens ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral issues such as anxiety, depression, and eating disorders.

For more information about how Solstice can help your daughter, call (866) 278-3345.

teens with social anxiety

Navigating Online Relationships for Teens with Social Anxiety

Navigating Online Relationships for Teens with Social Anxiety 2560 1709 srtc_admin

Social media is no longer just for networking with friends and family. In fact, many teens follow more influencers than people they know online. In order to go “viral” on a platform, their posts have to be public. As digital privacy becomes less important to teens, many teens are becoming more digitally intimate–sharing personal details online to people they don’t know in person. For teens with social anxiety who find it easier to develop online relationships than with their peers offline, it is important to remember that navigating online relationships requires different social rules. 

Why Does Socializing Online Feel Safer for Some Teens?

  • More anonymity
  • Delayed response time 
  • Can use filters, Photoshop, or a fake name
  • Less expectation of intimacy
  • Less fear of rejection 
  • Wider circle of acquaintances

For some teens who have experienced rejection and isolation offline, they may feel more comfortable interacting with others through a screen. Even if they recognize that their online relationships aren’t healthy or that the other person isn’t putting in enough effort, they may continue to pursue this relationship as online rejection hurts less than face-to-face rejection. If someone were to reject them online, it is not like the entire school would find out and shame them. 

Another benefit of socializing online for teens with social anxiety is that, in some ways, they might experience less Fear of Missing Out. They are able to maintain a wider circle of acquaintances and keep tabs on what is going on in the lives of people they know without being expected to start a conversation or make plans. This can reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness. 

Online socializing can help anxious teens maintain relationships with acquaintances that they may have struggled to make the effort to see, if they go to different schools or live in different cities. It can also help them develop stronger relationships with people that they may be too anxious to talk to at school. For example, introverted teens may prefer texting someone back and forth than picking up the phone or meeting someone at a coffeeshop for the same conversation, let alone trying to have the same conversation in front of a bigger group of people. Some people find it easier to make a generic post to their “followers” instead of sending the same text multiple times or starting a group chat with a restricted number of people, as they never know who might respond.

What Are the Risks Associated with Socializing Online?

  • Presenting a false self
  • Difficulty engaging in face-to-face interactions
  • Problems identifying red flags
  • Sexting
  • Getting catfished 

Social anxiety is often a predictor of internet addiction. Ironically, the more time teens spend worrying about how they are perceived online, the more likely they are to update their newsfeed or check for new notifications. One would think that the anxiety they experience around their social media presence would discourage them from being glued to their screens, but the opposite is usually true. The potential validation they might receive from online interactions often outweighs potential threats or hate messages.

How is Online Socializing Different from Offline Socializing?

  • Privacy Issues
  • Lack of Nonverbal Cues
  • Conversations cannot be permanently deleted
  • Hard to fully trust that the other person is being transparent
  • People are more likely to perform for an online audience

At a relationship-based residential treatment center for girls, teens learn how to be present with others offline and to interact without the distraction of smartphones. Many teens with social anxiety have developed insecurities in relationships based on past negative experiences with peers at school. In order to change beliefs about not being good enough in relationships, they must confront these beliefs and build evidence that this is not always true. 

Teens who had previously turned to the Internet to receive validation learn that they are liked by others when they act like their true selves. During group therapy, teens with social anxiety learn how to actively listen to others, ask for help, and provide mutual support as they discuss their relationship styles and how they developed these beliefs. This can lead to conversations about values in relationships, online safety, and ways to manage anxiety.

Solstice RTC Can Help 

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often struggle with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD,  technology addiction, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender-specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves offline and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about smartphone addiction, contact us at 866-278-3345. 

 

teenage mood swings

Teenage Mood Swings Can Be a Warning of Greater Issues

Teenage Mood Swings Can Be a Warning of Greater Issues 1710 2560 Solstice RTC

Teenagers are known for going from talking a mile a minute to slamming their bedroom doors and taking vows of silence the next. It can be just as confusing for your child as it feels to be on the receiving end of their sudden changes in mood and attitudes. Some degree of mood swings in teenagers in normal, as they experience a sudden influx of hormones and are struggling to navigate the bridge between childhood and the adult world, but teenage mood swings can be a warning sign for bigger issues. 

Why Are Teens so Moody?

There are multiple reasons teens are prone to moodiness and none of them occur in isolation. 

  • Puberty involves a lot of biological changes, both physically and neurologically. Being unfamiliar with these intense bursts of hormones can feel overwhelming. Hormone imbalances can lead to
  • Lack of emotional awareness. A common theme in teens is being able to admit their emotions are all over the place, but not really being able to explain what they’re feeling or where it’s coming from. Teen’s emotional brains develop at a more rapid pace than parts of their brain responsible for decision making. 
  • Changing social norms. Middle school is hard. High school is hard. Teens place a higher value on peer acceptance and feel pressure to conform to certain standards. In childhood, relationships aren’t based around social rules, at least not on a conscious level. However, as teens get older, they are more likely to struggle with trying to fit in, which can be an impossible task when trying to fit a certain mold.
  • Higher levels of stress. Adolescence is a period of a series of major life changes, often all at once. It is not surprising that teens are just as stressed out as adults, if not more. According to a recent survey, over a third of teens report that their stress levels have a significant impact on feelings of depression and exhaustion. 
  • Sleep deprivation. Teens need more sleep than any other age group and between school, extracurriculars, and socializing, they also get less sleep than other age groups. While they may not be pulling all-nighters all the time, over time, getting less sleep than their bodies need can lead to exhaustion and moodiness.

When to Reach out for Support

While most teens go through “phases” where their mood changes frequently, variability between extreme emotions usually decreases over time. Adults still experience the full range of emotions, but not quite as rapidly and they report having a greater sense of control over their emotions. For some people, this emotional roller coaster isn’t limited to adolescence. It is difficult to diagnose mood disorders, like bipolar, in adolescence because there are so many different factors that affect their mood swings. The biggest indicator that their mood swings may be a warning sign for something greater depends on how it impacts their daily functioning. 

Finding appropriate help depends on possible reasons for mood swings. In addition to bipolar disorder, they are also common in teens struggling with depression, ADHD, and post-traumatic stress.

Mood swings are associated with:

  • Difficulty managing intense emotions, like anger or hopelessness
  • Increased impulsivity and risky behaviors
  • More interpersonal conflict
  • Longer-lasting periods of intense emotions, such as days or weeks
  • Unstable sense of self

Solstice Can Help

Solstice RTC is a residential treatment program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with mental health issues, such as mood swings, anxiety, depression, trauma, and relationship struggles. We are dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

For more information about mood swings in teens, call 866-278-3345. 

 

teen refusing to go to school

Have A Teen Refusing To Go To School? Here’s Some Tips

Have A Teen Refusing To Go To School? Here’s Some Tips 5548 3699 srtc_admin

When your teen refuses to go to school, it can cause a power struggle in your home. You may find yourself in a constant battle with them. Rest assured knowing your teen is not the first teen to engage in school refusal. Recognize that there are many underlying reasons why your teen may refuse to go to school. Here are some things to consider:

  • The pressure that comes from school may be overwhelming. Juggling academics, a social life, sports, and hobbies may become too much for your teen and not going to school to face this anxiety may be their best coping mechanism.
  • Problems at school. Perhaps your teen is being bullied or feeling isolated. If one does not feel like they fit in anywhere, they are more likely to avoid going to the place where they are reminded of that.
  • Depression, drug abuse, and/or eating disorders. There could be mental or physical symptoms that are contributing to your teens desire to stay away from school. If this could be a possibility, have them evaluated by a medical professional.

Defining School Refusal

School refusal is not to be confused with school phobia. Experts note that there is a difference between the two concepts. School phobia is fear-based. This can be linked to a fear of a specific situation or object at school. School refusal is a sign of broader anxiety- this could be separation anxiety, general anxiety, or social anxiety.

School refusal is considered an urgent situation. Therapists tend to treat school refusal as a crisis. Once you seek professional help, they will immediately work to develop a plan to address the issue at hand.

Resources for School Refusal

Ultimately, you may not have the magic key in helping your teen get in a better mindset about school. However, there are ways you can support them in trying to cope with their emotions. Help for teen refusing to go to school goes beyond the home, but that does not mean you cannot help the situation at all. Here are some ideas on how you can be supportive for your teen:

  1. Start the conversation. Ask your teen why they feel like going to school is not an option for them.
  2. Ask them how you can help. Maybe your teen needs specific help addressing a situation that is bothering them. This can also be where you determine what resources they need.
  3. Provide them with resources. As a parent, it is your job to guide them to places where they can get help immediately.

Solstice RTC can help

Solstice RTC is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice RTC is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345.

 

risky teen behavior

Risky Teen Behaviors: Differences Between Positive and Negative Risks

Risky Teen Behaviors: Differences Between Positive and Negative Risks 640 426 Solstice RTC

The teenage years are the years in which one develops the desire to fit in. This desire may come with a high cost. During the adolescent years, opportunity and risk seem all the more appealing. A maturational imbalance may prevent teens from good decision-making during this period in their lives as well. While learning from our silly mistakes is an important part of growing up, teens still need guidance on how to better navigate themselves away from risky teen behaviors and towards a rewarding future. First, one must learn the difference between positive and negative risks. Here are some defining characteristics:

Positive risks: benefits an individual’s well-being, legal, socially acceptable, does not present severe negative consequences

Negative risks: harmful towards an individual’s well-being, illegal, socially unacceptable, may have severe consequences

The Risks Our Teens Should Take

As puberty hits so does a new wave of potential risks. As a parent, it is important to acknowledge these risks and learn to address them head on with your child. It is your job to put an emphasis on the good as a way to prevent the bad. First, you should know your child and their risky behaviors. Here are some signs that indicate that your child is a positive risk taker:

  • Internalizes family values
  • Has strong bonds to society
  • Possesses important socially-desirable long-term goals (academic or other)
  • Feels they have more to lose by taking negative risks
  • Is influenced by peers who take positive risks

The Four Friendly Risk Types

As a parent you should constantly suggest new ways to take positive risks for your teen. This starts with a conversation and then you can help them put it into action. Physical, social, academic, and extracurricular risks are a couple of categories you should consider talking with your teen able. What they are drawn to will vary based off of their personal interests. Here’s some ideas to get you started:

Physical Risks:

  • Try a new sport
  • Pursue a new fitness goal

Social Risks:

  • Spend time with a new group of people
  • Arrive at a party without knowing anyone
  • Attend a summer camp without friends
  • Attend a rally and hold up a sign 
  • Stand up for something you believe in at school even if it is unpopular
  • Pursue a new friendship with the risk of rejection

Academic Risks:

  • Sign up for a challenging AP course
  • Take a class you know nothing about
  • Join a club that interests you
  • Run for a school office position

Extracurricular Risks:

  • Adopt a new hobby
  • Learn to play an instrument
  • Start your own babysitting business or dog walking
  • Set goals to read more in your free time

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center Can Help

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, addictive behaviors, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides individual, group, and family therapy to help students heal and improve from every angle. Fitness, nutrition, and academics also play an important role in this program. Solstice gives young women the skills and help they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, healthy, and capable. We can help your family today!

Contact us at (866) 278-3345

 

Academic Challenges: How Overcoming Adversity Leads to Success

Academic Challenges: How Overcoming Adversity Leads to Success 1200 800 Solstice RTC

For some students, academic challenges aren’t just struggling to get an A on an exam or passing the SATs—for some, it can seem like an impossible obstacle that can’t be overcome. Students with learning differences, like ADHD, can sometimes slip under the radar in typical schools, never getting the help they need to thrive. 

Being in an environment that supports these students and guides them towards overcoming this adverse experience has been shown in studies to increase the chances of a student’s success later in life. 

How struggle can lead to future success

Many researchers argue that “resilience”–the ability to recover quickly from setbacks and challenges–is learned, you’re not born with it. This means that through deliberate actions, thoughts, and processes, you can acquire that skill.

A recent study found that in some cases “learning to set and adjust goals and cope with adversity is more important for life success than improving cognition.” Now, they’re not saying to stop reading or learning how to do calculus, they’re saying that these types of “resiliency” skills are incredibly important for thriving in life.

Think about it–we all go through hard times. It’s extremely unlikely for anyone to go their entire life without having at least one “bad” thing happen to them. Whether that bad thing is losing someone you love, getting in a car accident, getting fired, or failing an important class.

For teens, the latter can be devastating if they don’t have the right support system and thought processes. For example, take a student who already struggles with self-confidence because they have an undiagnosed learning disability. She studied as hard as she could and still failed the very important exam–now she feels even worse about herself and may even develop depression or anxiety.

The researchers in this study believe that training these teens who are prone to academic challenges and adversity could help them get through it more effectively. They discovered that by teaching struggling teens self regulation–such as setting goals or learning from their mistakes–helped them perform better in school and in life. While academic challenges take place in school, they’re often linked to outside issues that need to be dealt with.

If you believe your daughter’s academic challenges are the result of deeper issues, it’s important to reach out to a professional for further guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, academic challenges, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help with academic challenges at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

 

nonverbal learning disorder

Words Louder Than Actions: Dealing with a Nonverbal Learning Disorder

Words Louder Than Actions: Dealing with a Nonverbal Learning Disorder 2560 1707 Solstice RTC

Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Nonverbal Learning Disorder may simply be three types of an overarching issue, some scientists say. While there is no agreement in the scientific community (yet) about whether or not the statement is true, there are definite similarities between the three.

Signs of a Nonverbal Learning Disorder

Sometimes described as the opposite of dyslexia – an incorrect statement, but one that can be used to for the purposes of making an analogy – Nonverbal Learning Disorder is a condition in which a child has difficulty grasping concepts, relationships, ideas, and patterns, while not having trouble reading, decoding language, or memorizing material. Other patterns unique to a child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder include problems with spatial awareness, social communication, and fine motor skills. In some cases, Nonverbal Learning Disorder causes the child to repeat questions and take everything very literally.

As a parent, there are several steps that you can take to help deal with your child’s Nonverbal Learning Disorder. The first is to keep the environment as familiar as possible. Often, children with Nonverbal Learning Disorder have an aversion to new situations. By being as specific, logical, and organized as possible, you will minimize the levels of stress your child feels. Nonverbal Learning Disorder requires a routine – sticking to it helps your child focus on other things instead of being distracted by shifts in what they expect.

Another important factor is helping your child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder build confidence and self-esteem. Gently introducing them to safe social situations can teach your child to be more open while interacting with others. It may also prove useful to talk to teachers and school officials – explaining your situation will help the classroom be a more pleasant experience.

When raising a child with a learning disorder, it can also be helpful to contact professionals who will help your child adjust to everyday life.

Solstice can help

If your teen is struggling behavioral and emotional issues stemming from a learning disorder, Solstice can help guide them on a path towards success. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with difficulties such as trauma, depression, ADHD, and substance use.

For more information about how Solstice can help your daughter reach her fullest potential, please call  (866) 278-3345 today!

 

disordered eating

Are your daughter’s eating habits scary? Spotting disordered eating in teens

Are your daughter’s eating habits scary? Spotting disordered eating in teens 2560 1922 Solstice RTC

Is your teen constantly on a new diet? Is she always looking for a new way to cut carbs and lose a few pounds? Sometimes, trying to eat healthier is a good thing. However, if your teen is taking dieting very seriously it might be time to start worrying. Why? Because your daughter may be experiencing disordered eating.

Spotting disordered eating in your daughter

Disordered eating is defined as a wide array of irregular eating behaviors that don’t warrant a diagnosis of a specific eating disorder like bulimia nervosa or anorexia nervosa. Studies have shown that nearly 50 percent of the population demonstrates disordered eating. How can you tell if your daughter is dealing with this struggle? The answer to that question is complicated. Symptoms include:

  • Symptoms that resemble those found in eating disorders such as: binge eating, purging, and food restriction.
  • An exercise routine that may seem excessive or extremely rigid in its nature: For example, your teen might work out for several hours at a specific time of day every day.
  • Feelings of worry about certain foods: They will not eat specific foods because of one reason or another-  because they have too many calories or are high in fats.
  • Obsessive Calorie Counting: Your teen might have downloaded an app or bought a book that helps track their daily calories. They will restrict calories to such a degree that it is unhealthy for them.
  • An approach to food that is unusually rigid and inflexible: If your teen will only eat certain foods at specific times during the day, this might be a sign that she is experiencing disordered eating difficulties.

Disordered eating vs. an eating disorder

So what’s the difference between disordered eating and a full blown eating disorder? The answer lies in the degree of severity that symptoms present themselves. The symptoms associated with disordered eating are less severe than those in an eating disorder.

However, you should be just as concerned for your daughter with disordered eating. This issue can lessen your daughter’s ability to concentrate and focus (which is terrible for high school students trying to make good grades). It may impede on your teen’s social life because they refuse to break out of their diet or exercise regime to make time for friends. For some teens, disordered eating is a way to cope with anxiety or stress coming from some other aspect of their lives.

Getting Help

If your teen is suffering from eating issues, she may need professional help to overcome whatever is influencing her harmful eating behaviors. Solstice can help your daughter work through whatever struggles are causing your teen’s eating issues. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

 

Being a great role model: Mentoring youth in a positive way

Being a great role model: Mentoring youth in a positive way 2560 1706 Solstice RTC

January is National Mentor Month. For many young people, having a mentor in their life can greatly improve their overall motivation and self esteem. If someone is there who pushes you to be productive and work hard, you’re more likely to do well. For teen girls especially, having a role model to look up to can reshape the way they see the world and their overall behavior in an extremely positive way. But how can you forge such a strong bond with your own daughter? For girls struggling with trauma or other emotional and behavioral difficulties, being able to trust someone to such an intense degree can be hard. However, mentoring youth who have such difficulties is definitely do-able.

Building trust and strong bonds by mentoring youth

For many young people, having an inspiring mentor can help them grow as individuals both personally and professionally. Mentoring youth doesn’t have to entail a huge time commitment or a great amount of resources. Here’s a few tips on how to work on creating an effective mentoring relationship with your teen daughter:

  • Don’t force the connection: If your daughter doesn’t want to build a relationship with you, she won’t. In order for the mentorship to actually work, the bond between the two of you has to be 100 percent genuine. That means, both parties have to agree to spending time together.
  • Practice what you preach: If you’re teaching your daughter about the right way to do something, make sure it’s actually something you are doing yourself. For example, if you’re teaching her how to live a healthier lifestyle, try being healthy yourself. She won’t believe anything you say if you don’t carry out those actions in your own life.
  • Be a positive coach: Positive coaching is when a mentor helps a young person achieve specific goals for the purpose of growth. Studies have shown that positive coaching can help young people better deal with stress and achieve their goals.
  • Be open with your daughter: In order for your daughter to truly trust you, you need to open up to her about your own life experiences. You have to be willing to be vulnerable in order for your daughter to open up to you about her own thoughts and feelings.

Solstice rebuilds relationships

Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling daughter reach her fullest potential. We believe in fostering positive, trusting relationships between teen girls, their families, and other loved ones. 

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.