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depressed teenage daughter

Facts About Your Depressed Teenage Daughter

Facts About Your Depressed Teenage Daughter 4104 2736 srtc_admin

The onset of depression occurs differently based on the individual. A new study even suggests that males and females develop depression differently. Depression is often characterized by low mood, loss of interest and pleasure, and major changes to sleep and appetite. However, it is not limited to these symptoms.  Some of the few differing factors between boys in girls include the following:

  • Young women are almost twice as likely as men to develop depression
  • Previous research has found similar rates of depression in both male and female genders prior to puberty—though some findings suggest boys may be slightly more likely than girls to experience depression.
  • Women will continue to have a higher likelihood of meeting the criteria for depression in their adult years.

If you have a depressed teenage daughter, it is important to note why she may experience depressive symptoms and the factors that contribute to the mental illness. Some things to consider are listed below.

  • One explanation for this difference is the earlier puberty in females compared to males. For instance, previous research has shown that early age of first menstrual cycle is associated with greater depressive symptoms.
  • This increased reactivity and stressor responsiveness in adolescent girls may result in greater anxiety and depressive symptoms.
  • Female adolescents—compared to male adolescents—experience not only a more rapid increase in depressive symptoms at an earlier age but also more depressive symptoms overall.

How To Help Your Depressed Teenage Daughter

Helpguide.org suggests three tips on how you can help your depressed teenage daughter cope with her symptoms and get the help she needs. Here’s what the source says:

    1. Encourage Social Interaction. Isolation makes depression worse. You should make communicating with your teen a priority. Set aside time each day to have one-on-one time with your teen. Make efforts to keep your teen connected with friends. Suggest that they get together with their friends or have their friends come over. Surrounding themselves with other kids is a good way to combat social isolation. Getting them involved in sports, clubs, or other activities is a great start to meeting new friends.
    2. Prioritize physical health. Physical and mental health are directly connected. Depression can worsen as a result of inactivity, poor nutrition, and lack of sleep. Establish a healthy and supportive environment at home to encourage your teen to make healthy choices. Get them moving by coming up with creative ways to encourage physical activity. Set limits on screen time and make sure you have expectations of when your teen should be unplugged from their device. Lastly, keep healthy food options available to them.
    3. Know when to seek professional help. This is perhaps the most important part. When your teen’s struggles extend beyond your realm of knowledge or beyond your ability to give them helpful advice. You should reach out to a professional to help guide your teen to a healthier and happier life. You should research the resources available around you and do not hesitate to reach out to professionals.

 

 

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

risky teen behavior

Risky Teen Behaviors: Differences Between Positive and Negative Risks

Risky Teen Behaviors: Differences Between Positive and Negative Risks 640 426 Solstice RTC

The teenage years are the years in which one develops the desire to fit in. This desire may come with a high cost. During the adolescent years, opportunity and risk seem all the more appealing. A maturational imbalance may prevent teens from good decision-making during this period in their lives as well. While learning from our silly mistakes is an important part of growing up, teens still need guidance on how to better navigate themselves away from risky behavior and towards a rewarding future. First, one must learn the difference between positive and negative risks. Here are some defining characteristics:

Positive risks: benefits an individual’s well-being, legal, socially acceptable, does not present severe negative consequences

Negative risks: harmful towards an individual’s well-being, illegal, socially unacceptable, may have severe consequences

The Risks Our Teens Should Take

As puberty hits so does a new wave of potential risks. As a parent, it is important to acknowledge these risks and learn to address them head on with your child. It is your job to put an emphasis on the good as a way to prevent the bad. First, you should know your child and their risky behaviors. Here are some signs that indicate that your child is a positive risk taker:

  • Internalizes family values
  • Has strong bonds to society
  • Possesses important socially-desirable long-term goals (academic or other)
  • Feels they have more to lose by taking negative risks
  • Is influenced by peers who take positive risks

The Four Friendly Risk Types

As a parent you should constantly suggest new ways to take positive risks for your teen. This starts with a conversation and then you can help them put it into action. Physical, social, academic, and extracurricular risks are a couple of categories you should consider talking with your teen able. What they are drawn to will vary based off of their personal interests. Here’s some ideas to get you started:

Physical Risks:

  • Try a new sport
  • Pursue a new fitness goal

Social Risks:

  • Spend time with a new group of people
  • Arrive at a party without knowing anyone
  • Attend a summer camp without friends
  • Attend a rally and hold up a sign 
  • Stand up for something you believe in at school even if it is unpopular
  • Pursue a new friendship with the risk of rejection

Academic Risks:

  • Sign up for a challenging AP course
  • Take a class you know nothing about
  • Join a club that interests you
  • Run for a school office position

Extracurricular Risks:

  • Adopt a new hobby
  • Learn to play an instrument
  • Start your own babysitting business or dog walking
  • Set goals to read more in your free time

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center Can Help

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, addictive behaviors, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides individual, group, and family therapy to help students heal and improve from every angle. Fitness, nutrition, and academics also play an important role in this program. Solstice gives young women the skills and help they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, healthy, and capable. We can help your family today!

Contact us at (866) 278-3345

Beating Trauma with Trauma Focused CBT

Beating Trauma with Trauma Focused CBT 150 150 Solstice RTC

Trauma is a part of life. It comes in many different shapes and sizes, from national tragedies to personal hardships – and, whatever the cause, can leave a trail of pain in its wake. Trauma knows no age restrictions either: as a matter of fact, studies estimate that up to 43% of children experience trauma, with 3%-15% of girls consequently developing symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Trauma focused CBT is often utilized to help treat PTSD. 

If left untreated, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can cause a child to experience mood swings, become isolated, and constantly relive the experience. In extreme cases, it can even lead to severe problems such as substance use, dangerous behaviors, and poor school performance. As a parent of a child with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, it can sometimes be hard to know what to do. One moment, your daughter can seem normal; the next, she becomes a complete stranger. And, what’s worse, sometimes the origin of this trauma isn’t obvious. 

Fortunately, there is good news. Although Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can be difficult, there are ways to treat and overcome it. There are numerous approaches – all of which are available at residential treatment centers for trauma – including, among others, EMDR, neurofeedback, somatic experiencing, Trauma-Focused Equine Assisted Psychotherapy, and Trauma-Focused CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy).

Ways Trauma-Focused CBT Can Help Your Daughter

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is one of the most effective approaches at helping children who are coping with trauma. One of the benefits of Trauma Focused CBT is its unique focus on helping the entire family deal with the aftereffects of trauma. As a holistic approach, Trauma Focused CBT doesn’t merely attempt to cure the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; instead, its primary purpose is to help heal the mind, body, and spirit. Where only too many approaches are content with brushing the problem under the rug, Trauma Focused CBT centers on the underlying problem. By helping your daughter overcome the root of the problem, Trauma Focused CBT offers one of the most comprehensive solutions to dealing with trauma.

At the heart of Trauma Focused CBT is building an environment in which your daughter can feel safe. With the aid of the therapy, a child receives the necessary support to be able to discuss their traumatic experience. Openly talking about the issue allows therapists to guide the struggling children toward reevaluating the misconstrued beliefs that stem from the trauma.

Moreover, Trauma Focused CBT works in conjunction with the family. By utilizing a relationship-based approach (one that forms bonds between the child, the parent, and the therapist), Trauma Focused CBT allows a “therapeutic alliance” to be formed. The trust and respect shown on all sides of the balance are vital elements of the healing process both for the struggling child and for the adults affected by their children’s troubles.

It is also important to note that Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is more than a theoretical approach; in fact, it is a hands-on journey to a healthy future. The skills learned in Trauma Focused CBT last a lifetime.

Solstice RTC can help

If your teen girl is struggling with emotional or behavioral difficulties due to a trauma-related issue, Solstice can help her find success.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.

Putting the Pieces Back Together: Helping Your Daughter through the Effects of Trauma in Teens

Putting the Pieces Back Together: Helping Your Daughter through the Effects of Trauma in Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

As far as adults are concerned, childhood is the best time of a person’s life. Unfortunately, for a large number of teens, that is not the case. For some, the culprit is simply puberty. For up to 43% of children, however, the issue is more serious – 15%-43% of girls experience trauma, with a further 3%-15% developing symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The effects of trauma in teens can be dramatic and harsh.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is one of the most extreme effects of trauma in teens; however, there are many effects of trauma in teens that could potentially develop. Perhaps one of the most important things to note is the fact that the effects of trauma in teens are as “real” as that of a veteran following a war. All trauma is different and there is no one-size-fits-all approach to curing the effects of trauma in teens. It is also important to note that trauma can take a number of forms – from personal tragedies to national disasters. There is no trauma that is too small to cause a problem.

Recognizing the Effects of Trauma in Teens

As a parent of a child suffering the effects of trauma in teens, the first step to making the problem better, is to recognize it exists. Often, parents find it difficult to admit that their child is struggling with a mental issue. In order to begin the healing process, though, it is vital that these effects addressed. 

The effects of trauma in teens can vary in severity. In virtually all cases, though, trauma in teens combine both the effects of trauma in younger children with those of adults. In other words, teenagers get the worst of both worlds. Typically, the effects of trauma in teens include fear, anger, withdrawal, and isolation. Suffering from trauma may cause your child to exhibit reckless and dangerous behaviors. Depression, hopelessness, and flawed reconstruction of memories can also be a consequence of trauma.

Ways to Help Your Child Overcome the Effects of Trauma in Teens

If you see signs of trauma in your child, the sooner you get help, the better. If left untreated, the effects of trauma in teens can linger and cause problems all the way into adulthood. Some tips to remember include:

  • Listen. Opening lines of communication with your struggling child will allow you to support them through this difficult time. If your child feels safe approaching you to discuss the problem, you will be better-equipped to help it.
  • Don’t judge. Trauma doesn’t even have to be experienced personally. While marital problems in someone else’s family may not seem serious to you, they may be devastating for your child.
  • Stay positive. Showing your child that you are worried only makes the effects of trauma in teens worse.
  • Keep a routine. Trauma may cause a child to lose appetite or sleep. Staying healthy is key to preventing the effects of trauma in teens from taking over.
  • Consider professional help. It may be difficult for symptoms to go away on their own. If your child exhibits the effects of trauma in teens, it could be time to contact a professional.

Solstice RTC can help

Solstice RTC, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling daughter find success.

For more information about Solstice RTC, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Building Confidence: Fun Self Esteem Activities for Teens

Building Confidence: Fun Self Esteem Activities for Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

In today’s electronic-centered world, teens encounter one impossible standard after another. What’s worse, while back in the day there was simple reflection time without the intrusion of a screen, today the constant bombardment of information is seemingly inescapable. Between not having truly private moments and trying to live up to what the media glamorizes, it is no surprise that kids of today have more difficulty than ever building a positive image of themselves. Fortunately, as a parent, there are numerous self-esteem activities for teens that can help set them back on track.

Ideas for Self Esteem Activities for Teens

The most important thing to remember when exploring new self esteem activities for teens, is that it’s about your child. Moreover, it may require you several attempts to find the activities your teen enjoys, as opposed to the ones you think your teen will enjoy. Another thing to keep in mind, is that positive self-esteem activities for teens begin at home: no matter how much character you build doing various tasks, at the end of the day, encouraging your child and letting them know they are special the way they are will build a foundation for their self-esteem.  

Some fun self-esteem activities for teens can include ones that allow them to test their individuality or learn to rely on themselves. Part of building self-esteem and confidence is leaving the comfort zone – but not too far at first. Physical activities, such as sports or hiking, can be a healthy way to make your child feel empowered. Encouraging your kids to try themselves at various forms of artistic expression – many schools offer extracurricular activities to that end – may help them discover a hidden talent or passion. In the end, remind your children that nobody is an expert at first; learning to do new things is half the experience.

Solstice can help

Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter find success. Solstice helps girls struggling with behavioral and emotional difficulties such as self esteem issues, depression, anxiety, and trauma. For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Instant Gratification Times 1000: Teaching Your Teen Impulse Control

Instant Gratification Times 1000: Teaching Your Teen Impulse Control 150 150 Solstice RTC

Sometimes it seems that teens have the impulse control of a, well, teenager. One moment, they seem like rational human beings and then they do something so incredibly reckless, you cannot help but wonder what they were thinking. Fortunately, there’s a scientific answer: it’s all about the brain.

Educating Your Teen about Impulse Control

The teenage brain is still in the process of developing. This process not only leads to teenagers pushing boundaries and searching for individuality; it promotes risk-taking behaviors with little regard for consequence. The behaviors can range from mood issues resulting in confrontation and “borrowing” without asking, to substance abuse, kleptomania, compulsive sexuality, and many others.

As a parent of a teen with impulse control issues, there are several steps that you can take to make the problem easier. Typically, impulse control comes with age; however, a few tips can help relieve tension until that time comes. The most important thing to remember is to stay positive. As with many other situations, by losing your temper, you only add fuel to the fire; what could have been a calm discussion turns into a power struggle. 

Try to keep communication open. While it may be tempting for a parent to simply lay down the law, a real conversation is a two-way street. Setting a strict system of cause-and-effect (break the rules, deal with the consequences) does not teach your child why impulse control is important; sitting down and talking about the effect of recklessness does. Even though there are situations when remaining patient can prove difficult, in the end, the best way to teach your child impulse control is to exhibit impulse control yourself.

In some cases, impulse control issues may be symptoms of a deeper problem such as ADHD or anxiety. If your teen exhibits behaviors that could point to something else or your teen’s impulse control issues are getting out of hand, it may be time to consider professional help.

Solstice can help

If your teen is struggling with controlling their impulsive behavior, Solstice can help. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral issues like defiance, ADHD, substance use, and trauma.

For more information about how Solstice can help your teen, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Words Louder Than Actions: Dealing with a Nonverbal Learning Disorder

Words Louder Than Actions: Dealing with a Nonverbal Learning Disorder 150 150 Solstice RTC

Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Nonverbal Learning Disorder may simply be three types of an overarching issue, some scientists say. While there is no agreement in the scientific community (yet) about whether or not the statement is true, there are definite similarities between the three.

Signs of a Nonverbal Learning Disorder

Sometimes described as the opposite of dyslexia – an incorrect statement, but one that can be used to for the purposes of making an analogy – Nonverbal Learning Disorder is a condition in which a child has difficulty grasping concepts, relationships, ideas, and patterns, while not having trouble reading, decoding language, or memorizing material. Other patterns unique to a child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder include problems with spatial awareness, social communication, and fine motor skills. In some cases, Nonverbal Learning Disorder causes the child to repeat questions and take everything very literally.nonverbal learning disorder

As a parent, there are several steps that you can take to help deal with your child’s Nonverbal Learning Disorder. The first is to keep the environment as familiar as possible. Often, children with Nonverbal Learning Disorder have an aversion to new situations. By being as specific, logical, and organized as possible, you will minimize the levels of stress your child feels. Nonverbal Learning Disorder requires a routine – sticking to it helps your child focus on other things instead of being distracted by shifts in what they expect.

Another important factor is helping your child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder build confidence and self-esteem. Gently introducing them to safe social situations can teach your child to be more open while interacting with others. It may also prove useful to talk to teachers and school officials – explaining your situation will help the classroom be a more pleasant experience.

When raising a child with a learning disorder, it can also be helpful to contact professionals who will help your child adjust to everyday life.

Solstice can help

If your teen is struggling behavioral and emotional issues stemming from a learning disorder, Solstice can help guide them on a path towards success. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with difficulties such as trauma, depression, ADHD, and substance use.

For more information about how Solstice can help your daughter reach her fullest potential, please call  (866) 278-3345 today!

Are your daughter’s eating habits scary? Spotting disordered eating in teens

Are your daughter’s eating habits scary? Spotting disordered eating in teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

Is your teen constantly on a new diet? Is she always looking for a new way to cut carbs and lose a few pounds? Sometimes, trying to eat healthier is a good thing. However, if your teen is taking dieting very seriously it might be time to start worrying. Why? Because your daughter may be experiencing disordered eating.

Spotting disordered eating in your daughter

Disordered eating is defined as a wide array of irregular eating behaviors that don’t warrant a diagnosis of a specific eating disorder like bulimia nervosa or anorexia nervosa. Studies have shown that nearly 50 percent of the population demonstrates disordered eating. How can you tell if your daughter is dealing with this struggle? The answer to that question is complicated. Symptoms include: 

disordered eating

Image source: Flickr user- joshua

 

  • Symptoms that resemble those found in eating disorders such as: binge eating, purging, and food restriction.
  • An exercise routine that may seem excessive or extremely rigid in its nature: For example, your teen might work out for several hours at a specific time of day every day.
  • Feelings of worry about certain foods: They will not eat specific foods because of one reason or another-  because they have too many calories or are high in fats.
  • Obsessive Calorie Counting: Your teen might have downloaded an app or bought a book that helps track their daily calories. They will restrict calories to such a degree that it is unhealthy for them.
  • An approach to food that is unusually rigid and inflexible: If your teen will only eat certain foods at specific times during the day, this might be a sign that she is experiencing disordered eating difficulties.

Disordered eating vs. an eating disorder

So what’s the difference between disordered eating and a full blown eating disorder? The answer lies in the degree of severity that symptoms present themselves. The symptoms associated with disordered eating are less severe than those in an eating disorder.

However, you should be just as concerned for your daughter with disordered eating. Disordered eating can lessen your daughter’s ability to concentrate and focus (which is terrible for high school students trying to make good grades). It may impede on your teen’s social life because they refuse to break out of their diet or exercise regime to make time for friends. For some teens, disordered eating is a way to cope with anxiety or stress coming from some other aspect of their lives.

Getting Help

If your teen is suffering from eating issues, she may need professional help to overcome whatever is influencing her harmful eating behaviors. Solstice can help your daughter work through whatever struggles are causing your teen’s eating issues. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

 

Why Send Your Daughter to a Residential Treatment Center for Girls?

Why Send Your Daughter to a Residential Treatment Center for Girls? 150 150 Solstice RTC

We’ve all heard the horror stories. Military-style boot camps. “Scared Straight” programs.

But this couldn’t be farther from the truth.

In reality, a residential treatment center for girls is an environment specifically geared toward giving your child a safe space. Growing up is never easy, but with the aid of caring professionals, your daughter will be able to work through her issues. residential treatment center for girls

Benefits of a Residential Treatment Center for Girls

A residential treatment center for girls offers many ways in which to guide your daughter back on track. The most common reasons for considering a residential treatment center for girls include:

  • Helping your daughter’s problems. Outward behavior often reflects inner turmoil. For instance – and this is merely one example – it is easy to write school refusal off as stubbornness. However, chances are, there’s an underlying cause. A residential treatment center for girls specializes in identifying and confronting these problems.
  • Treatment for mental illness. Puberty is especially difficult for those struggling with a mental disorder. At a residential treatment center for girls, if your daughter struggles with such a condition, on-staff psychiatrists well help her learn that she is not defined by her illness.
  • Building family relationships. A residential treatment center for girls focuses on teaching your child how to bond with the rest of the family. The ultimate goal is, after all, to make your daughter better-equipped to encounter the world – by strengthening her ties to the ones close to her, she will be ready for anything to come.
  • Getting back the daughter you love. Sometimes, seemingly overnight, the child you know can turn into a complete stranger. No matter how hard you try, everything sets her off – and you watch her slip into dangerous, reckless behaviors. At a residential treatment center for girls, your daughter will be helped along a path towards success.

Consider Solstice

Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties. Solstice can help your daughter reach her fullest potential.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

A Damaging Emotional Outlet: Identifying Self Harm In Teens

A Damaging Emotional Outlet: Identifying Self Harm In Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

In today’s high schools, teens are experiencing an extreme amount of stress. They are pressured to do well in school and excel in extracurriculars, all while having an active social life. Getting into a good university is more difficult than it has ever been in the past. Because of this, teens are turning to outlets to relieve this stress. For some, these outlets come in healthier forms like daily exercise and art. However, others turn to substance use and even self harm. Self harm in teens is a way for some people to get fast acting relief when they are feeling extremely stressed. Knowing if your daughter is self harming can be hard. Being able to identify the signs of self harm in teens allows you to take the appropriate preventative measures. 

How can I identify self harm in teens?

Spotting the signs of self harm in your daughter is the first step to getting her the help she needs. The following are symptoms of self harm in teens

  • Marks on their skin that may have come from cutting or burning
  • Hidden objects in their room that they may use to cut or burn themselves such as knives, razors, lighters, or box cutters.
  • Locking herself away for hours on end after coming home from an upsetting day at school.
  • Someone else (such as another adult, sibling, or friend of your daughter) reports seeing cuts or burns on your teen’s body.
  • Your teen covers themselves up with long sleeves and pants even in hot weather.

How do I help my teen?

Talking to your teen about their self injurious behavior is not easy. Here are a few tips for helping a teen who self harms:

  • Don’t be judgmental: Judging your teen for harming themselves will only make the situation much worse.
  • Find out what the issue is: Try to understand why your teen has resorted to self harm. This can help you see your teen’s struggles through their eyes.
  • Start a conversation: Opening the lines of communication with your teen during this difficult time can help them express to you what they’re feeling in a positive way.
  • Be supportive: Don’t overreact and punish or threaten your teen because of their self harming behaviors. Instead, let your teen know that you’re there to support them and can talk to them anytime they would feel comfortable reaching out to you.
  • Find professional support: Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter get the therapeutic support she needs.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.