• Residential Treatment Program for Teens 14-17

Teen Girl Issues

teen in crisis

5 Ways to Connect with Your Teen in Crisis

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Have you ever tried to talk to your daughter mid-sob? In between gasps for breath, she is less likely to want to have a conversation. In fact, talking about why she’s upset in the moment might lead to more tears and lashing out. It’s difficult to allow her time to decompress when you want to connect with your teen in crisis, but giving her space to feel how she feels allows you to revisit the issue later when you are both able to have a more productive conversation. 

“I feel so disconnected from her when she’s struggling”

When your daughter is struggling with depression, relationship problems, or trauma, you want her to feel comfortable talking to you about it. She may prefer to deal with things on her own or turn to her friends, but it can feel like she is hiding things from you or that she doesn’t trust you. Even if she doesn’t vocalize what she is going through, it can have an impact on the entire family.

You may not understand what she’s going through if you haven’t experienced similar things. You may be just as comfortable tiptoeing around the white elephant in the room. The disconnect may come from wanting to say the right thing or do the right thing and worrying that she won’t be receptive to how you try to connect with her. 

Although it can feel personal, it is not your fault, but it isn’t hers either. 

Ways to Support Your Struggling Teen in Crisis:

 

  • Be patient. If your teen is in the middle of a personal crisis, it will take time for them to find their footing again. You may be confident that you have solutions that might work for them, but they may not be in a solution-oriented mindset yet. While you may want your daughter to feel better, offering solutions can be internalized as “not being allowed to feel the way I do.” Listen to them express their emotions and let them have that space. When they are ready to ask for suggestions, they will ask.
  • Be present. Whether or not they want to talk about how they feel, let them know that you are there for them. Acknowledge that what they are going through is difficult. You may not be able to offer new solutions, but it can be comforting to know that they are not alone as they go through this. Continue to check in.
  • Be specific. Asking open-ended questions like, “is there anything I can do” implies infinite possibilities but may also suggest that you aren’t confident about what might help. Often, your teen might not know either. Coming up with a few concrete suggestions can encourage them to think about and choose what might be beneficial. Be willing to be flexible if they turn down your first suggestions.
  • Try to distract them from overwhelming feelings. Even if they reach out to you, chances are focusing on how they feel by processing it can sometimes reinforce how often they’re stuck in those thoughts. Suggest doing something fun together to get their mind off the situation.
  • Take care of yourself. It can be difficult to separate your daughter’s feelings from your own as you try to step in to help. It’s important to remember that her emotions can influence your own. Role model self-care by putting yourself first so that you are better prepared to be there for them. 

 

Solstice Can Help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy along with an accredited academic program that emphasizes creative expression and experiential learning. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions.

Contact us at 866-278-3345. We can help your family today!

emotional intelligence

How Emotional Intelligence Can be a Protective Factor for Teens with Emotional Issues

How Emotional Intelligence Can be a Protective Factor for Teens with Emotional Issues 3872 2592 srtc_admin

While being able to identify negative emotions doesn’t always mean you are able to avoid them, research suggests that teenagers who can describe their negative emotions in details are more resilient when negative emotions arise. Emotional intelligence, or being more aware and understanding of your feelings, is associated with better emotion regulation. This may mean they’re more in touch with physical sensations associated with feelings and are better at noticing when they begin to feel overwhelmed, but it also means they have developed the skills necessary to process these emotions and move forward. Developing emotional intelligence can help teens reduce suffering associated with their emotional issues. 

What is Emotional Intelligence?

  • The ability to recognize your emotions
  • Understanding why you’re experiencing those emotions
  • Managing your emotions and reactions to emotional experiences
  • Being able to choose a different mood or feeling when you dislike the way you feel
  • Understanding how others might feel and why
  • Showing empathy towards others

While these are all important life skills, teenagers are still developing parts of their brains that allow them to develop this awareness. However, the emotional side of their brain has developed substantially in the past few years with their undeveloped rational side of their brain struggling the balance. This explains why many teenagers may claim to be very “in touch with their feelings,” but struggle to control the emotions they feel when they are affecting them negatively. 

According to the study, which aimed to investigate whether emotional intelligence was a result of depression or a protective factor against it, teens who struggle to differentiate between types of negative emotions are at a higher risk of experiencing symptoms of depression following stressful life events. 

How is it Beneficial?

 “Adolescents who use more granular terms such as ‘I feel annoyed,’ or ‘I feel frustrated,’ or ‘I feel ashamed’ — instead of simply saying ‘I feel bad’ — are better protected against developing increased depressive symptoms after experiencing a stressful life event,” explains Lisa Starr, a professor at the University of Rochester. “Emotions convey a lot of information. They communicate information about the person’s motivational state, level of arousal, emotional valence, and appraisals of the threatening experience. Basically, you need to know the way you feel in order to change the way you feel.”

Some outcomes of increased emotional intelligence may include:

  • Increased confidence
  • Healthier coping skills
  • More resilience
  • Healthier relationships
  • Improved social skills
  • More assertiveness
  • Better problem-solving and decision-making abilities
  • Less impulsivity

Solstice Can Help

Solstice West RTC  is a residential treatment program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy to allow girls to explore themselves in a variety of ways. Through groups on various topics, girls learn to become more aware of their emotions and to express them appropriately to others. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. 

For more information about our how Solstice helps teen girls build emotional intelligence, call 866-278-3345. We can help your family today!

 

trauma sensitive mindfulness

Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness: Deepening Awareness of Others’ Individual Needs

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David Treleaven, author of “Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness: Practices for  Safe and Transformative Healing” defines trauma as “any experience stressful enough to leave us feeling helpless, frightened, and profoundly unsure. After such experiences, we are left with a diminished sense of security with others and in the world, and a sense of feeling unsafe inside our own skin.” Treleaven suggests that integrating Trauma-informed techniques into mindfulness practices helps make the benefits of mindfulness more accessible to everyone.

How Traumatic Stress Interferes with Mindfulness

David Treleaven discusses the subtler ways that our body can be traumatized by certain experiences and how these experiences can get in the way of being fully present during traditional mindfulness practices that are intended to reduce symptoms of traumatic stress rather than trigger them. In traditional settings, it can be difficult for mindfulness teachers to pick up on signs that their students may have a history of trauma; however, they can pick up on body cues that signal discomfort, tension, or insecurity. 

4 R’s of Trauma-informed Therapy: 

 

  • Recognizes symptoms. Our therapists conduct thorough assessments of students and discuss their trauma history directly, but they also observe their triggers and the way their body responds when discussing trauma and in their everyday lives.
  • Realizes the impact. Our therapists have years of experience working with teen girls who have a history of trauma and have seen how it can impact multiple areas of their life, including relationships, academic performance, and self-esteem.
  • Responds by integrating knowledge about trauma into policies. They are sensitive to their student’s history and use strategies that emphasize self-regulation and nonjudgment. 
  • Resisting re-traumatization is the end goal of trauma-informed therapy: students have learned to identify triggers, challenge negative thoughts, and choose a different path. 

 

Goals of Trauma-informed Mindfulness: 

 

  • To minimize distress for people practicing mindfulness
  • To forward a systemic understanding of trauma
  • To advocate for a continued partnership between mindfulness practitioners and Trauma professionals

 

Integrating Mindfulness into Trauma Therapy

We integrate a variety of evidence-based techniques into our treatment model for trauma, including mindfulness, somatic experiencing, EMDR, and Brainspotting. By focusing on the relationship between how the body stores traumatic stress and how the mind processes it, we are able to help students begin the healing process. These techniques encourage students to slow down and increase awareness of their inner experience. 

While many mindfulness practices may involve controlling the breath and focusing on specific things, the goal of Trauma-sensitive mindfulness is to notice whatever is happening in your body and to let go of judgments about what your practice is supposed to look like. This may include changing settings, moving more often, playing certain songs, or scratching sitting all together and looking for other ways to find your flow free from judgment and fear. Mindfulness practices and mindful living principles are an integral part of our program as coping mechanisms and healthy habits.

Solstice RTC Can Help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and relationship struggles. We offer a multidisciplinary holistic approach to trauma recovery, including mindfulness, EMDR, and Brainspotting. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345.

family therapy for teens with depression

We are Family: Family Therapy for Teens with Depression

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When teens struggle with depression it can affect the whole family. In order for a family to give their teens the help and support they need—their own health needs to be a priority. This is why research says parents may benefit from treatment too. It is not uncommon for families to set their own issues aside to focus their energy on getting their teen better. However, this can be unhealthy and pose long-term negative effects

  1. Irritability coming from a depressed teen can cause conflict and alter family dynamics. 
  2. Negative thought patterns can become contagious and cause increased pessimism in the house. 
  3. Depressed teens may withdraw themselves from the family which hinders relationships. 
  4. Major responsibilities can shift. 
  5. A general burden of stress can grow in the household. 

These are the truths of how families can be impacted by depression. Family therapy for teens with depression is beneficial for more reasons than just “putting things back together”. This type of therapy creates an opportunity for families to reconnect and create a healthier environment for themselves. 

Family First Approach 

While having one’s family a part of their healing journey is important, the healing experience for the whole family unit is just as important. The process may not be easy, but it will be worth it. A family is like a team—you need everyone on the same page to effectively function. When everyone’s health and happiness is in check, the family dynamic is much stronger and well-equipped to support each other during challenging times. Family therapy has been proven a critical part of achieving long-term success for teens recovering from depression. Family therapy for teens with depression can work on confronting the following things:

  • Focus on healing damaged relationships 
  • Restore healthy connections within the family dynamic 
  • Create new healthy ways to cope with emotions 
  • Talk through one’s current struggles 
  • Establish lasting changes within the family 

Residential Treatment: Where does Family Fit?

Teens with depression can gain great benefits from enrolling in residential treatment. This allows them to remove themselves from their life and focus on healing from every angle with the help of professionals. The good news? Often times residential treatment programs strive to make the family a huge part of the healing process—not only their child’s healing but the family’s too. Don’t be afraid to reach out and seek resources to help your family as a whole. 

Solstice can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345 

Teenage Mood Swings Can Be a Warning of Greater Issues

Teenage Mood Swings Can Be a Warning of Greater Issues 150 150 Solstice RTC

Teenagers are known for going from talking a mile a minute to slamming their bedroom doors and taking vows of silence the next. It can be just as confusing for your child as it feels to be on the receiving end of their sudden changes in mood and attitudes. Some degree of mood swings in teenagers in normal, as they experience a sudden influx of hormones and are struggling to navigate the bridge between childhood and the adult world, but teenage mood swings can be a warning sign for bigger issues. 

Why Are Teens so Moody?

There are multiple reasons teens are prone to moodiness and none of them occur in isolation. 

  • Puberty involves a lot of biological changes, both physically and neurologically. Being unfamiliar with these intense bursts of hormones can feel overwhelming. Hormone imbalances can lead to 
  • Lack of emotional awareness. A common theme in teens is being able to admit their emotions are all over the place, but not really being able to explain what they’re feeling or where it’s coming from. Teen’s emotional brains develop at a more rapid pace than parts of their brain responsible for decision making. 
  • Changing social norms. Middle school is hard. High school is hard. Teens place a higher value on peer acceptance and feel pressure to conform to certain standards. In childhood, relationships aren’t based around social rules, at least not on a conscious level. However, as teens get older, they are more likely to struggle with trying to fit in, which can be an impossible task when trying to fit a certain mold.
  • Higher levels of stress. Adolescence is a period of a series of major life changes, often all at once. It is not surprising that teens are just as stressed out as adults, if not more. According to a recent survey, over a third of teens report that their stress levels have a significant impact on feelings of depression and exhaustion. 
  • Sleep deprivation. Teens need more sleep than any other age group and between school, extracurriculars, and socializing, they also get less sleep than other age groups. While they may not be pulling all-nighters all the time, over time, getting less sleep than their bodies need can lead to exhaustion and moodiness.

When to Reach out for Support

While most teens go through “phases” where their mood changes frequently, variability between extreme emotions usually decreases over time. Adults still experience the full range of emotions, but not quite as rapidly and they report having a greater sense of control over their emotions. For some people, this emotional roller coaster isn’t limited to adolescence. It is difficult to diagnose mood disorders, like bipolar, in adolescence because there are so many different factors that affect their mood swings. The biggest indicator that their mood swings may be a warning sign for something greater depends on how it impacts their daily functioning. 

Finding appropriate help depends on possible reasons for mood swings. In addition to bipolar disorder, they are also common in teens struggling with depression, ADHD, and post-traumatic stress.

Mood swings are associated with:

  • Difficulty managing intense emotions, like anger or hopelessness
  • Increased impulsivity and risky behaviors
  • More interpersonal conflict
  • Longer-lasting periods of intense emotions, such as days or weeks
  • Unstable sense of self

Solstice Can Help

Solstice RTC is a residential treatment program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with mental health issues, such as mood swings, anxiety, depression, trauma, and relationship struggles. We are dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

For more information about mood swings in teens, call 866-278-3345. 

 

depressed teenage daughter

Facts About Your Depressed Teenage Daughter

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The onset of depression occurs differently based on the individual. A new study even suggests that males and females develop depression differently. Depression is often characterized by low mood, loss of interest and pleasure, and major changes to sleep and appetite. However, it is not limited to these symptoms.  Some of the few differing factors between boys in girls include the following:

  • Young women are almost twice as likely as men to develop depression
  • Previous research has found similar rates of depression in both male and female genders prior to puberty—though some findings suggest boys may be slightly more likely than girls to experience depression.
  • Women will continue to have a higher likelihood of meeting the criteria for depression in their adult years.

If you have a depressed teenage daughter, it is important to note why she may experience depressive symptoms and the factors that contribute to the mental illness. Some things to consider are listed below.

  • One explanation for this difference is the earlier puberty in females compared to males. For instance, previous research has shown that early age of first menstrual cycle is associated with greater depressive symptoms.
  • This increased reactivity and stressor responsiveness in adolescent girls may result in greater anxiety and depressive symptoms.
  • Female adolescents—compared to male adolescents—experience not only a more rapid increase in depressive symptoms at an earlier age but also more depressive symptoms overall.

How To Help Your Depressed Teenage Daughter

Helpguide.org suggests three tips on how you can help your depressed teenage daughter cope with her symptoms and get the help she needs. Here’s what the source says:

    1. Encourage Social Interaction. Isolation makes depression worse. You should make communicating with your teen a priority. Set aside time each day to have one-on-one time with your teen. Make efforts to keep your teen connected with friends. Suggest that they get together with their friends or have their friends come over. Surrounding themselves with other kids is a good way to combat social isolation. Getting them involved in sports, clubs, or other activities is a great start to meeting new friends.
    2. Prioritize physical health. Physical and mental health are directly connected. Depression can worsen as a result of inactivity, poor nutrition, and lack of sleep. Establish a healthy and supportive environment at home to encourage your teen to make healthy choices. Get them moving by coming up with creative ways to encourage physical activity. Set limits on screen time and make sure you have expectations of when your teen should be unplugged from their device. Lastly, keep healthy food options available to them.
    3. Know when to seek professional help. This is perhaps the most important part. When your teen’s struggles extend beyond your realm of knowledge or beyond your ability to give them helpful advice. You should reach out to a professional to help guide your teen to a healthier and happier life. You should research the resources available around you and do not hesitate to reach out to professionals.

 

 

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

 

Effects of Childhood Trauma

Lingering Physiological Effects of Childhood Trauma

Lingering Physiological Effects of Childhood Trauma 0 0 srtc_admin

It is commonly accepted that an accumulation of multiple adverse childhood experiences makes adults more likely to continue to face negative experiences. However, a recent study conducted by the University of Missouri revealed that adults who have experienced childhood trauma still experience the physical effects years later. Especially as children’s brains are still developing rapidly, experiencing traumatic events leaves them vulnerable to rewiring of circuits and underdevelopment of neural connectivity. The narratives we adopt about our traumatic experiences are deeply ingrained in our brain’s stress response system which makes it difficult for adults to recover from the lingering effects of childhood trauma.

Understanding Effects of Childhood Trauma On Development

It is hard for us to recall our earliest memories before the age of seven. While we are more likely to remember significant events or vague schemas of a vacation or a childhood friend, most people suffer from childhood amnesia, which refers to our brain’s inability to store early memories into long-term memories due to its stage in development.

Ironically, the first seven years of our lives are also the most formative in developing a sense of self, our perspective of the world, coping skills, and attachment styles. It is when the majority of our language learning takes place and how we learn to orient ourselves in space and time.

For children who have experienced early childhood trauma during this critical stage of personal growth, their development may be profoundly altered by adoption of negative beliefs about themselves, their relationships, and their outlook on like. Physiologically, their ability to self regulate may be impacted by hyperarousal and persistent anxiety.

While the type of traumatic events adults face may be different than trauma children experience at home, developmental trauma refers to the effect of early adverse experiences on the brain’s ability to develop executive functioning skills that help build resilience and protect one’s safety later in life. The lower parts of our brain are dedicated to survival, while upper parts of our brain that develop during childhood involve emotion regulation, moral judgment, and problem solving. Interrupting one’s brain development during survival mode can trigger survival responses to stressors as an adult if they don’t have the skills to self-regulate.

Biological Resilience

According to University of Missouri postdoctoral fellow Yang Li, “our model indicates some women are biologically more resilient than others to PTSD. Normally, the body’s stress response system is regulated by two hormones: cortisol, which floods the body in response to a stressful event, and oxytocin, which brings cortisol levels back down once the stressor has passed.”

They found that women with a dissociative form of PTSD were more likely to have significant changes in cortisol and oxytocin that impact their ability to respond to stress appropriately. These biological markers may contribute to their disrupted sense of of self and their surroundings.

The study concludes that hormone levels may be key to understanding why some people are more likely to experience a traumatic response to certain events and some people may be more resilient or unaffected. It also suggests that we should focus more on regulating physiological causes and symptoms of stress before addressing stressful situations so that people are better prepared to make sense of their experiences.

Li notes that “PTSD might surface in response to a specific event in adulthood, but what we are seeing suggests that in many cases, the real root of the problem is in the damage caused during childhood.”

Lasting Effects

Due to childhood amnesia, many symptoms of early traumatic stress are internalized or are hard to process properly. Teenagers may struggle to understand that their overwhelming emotions are stemming from something deeper than typical hormone shifts or stressful everyday situations.

Effects of traumatic stress depend on the individual; however, regardless of how it appears, it is usually considered a risk factor for later problems in adulthood.

  • Avoiding situations that make them recall the traumatic event
  • Experiencing nightmares or flashbacks about the trauma
  • Seeking out or ending up in similar situations or relationships
  • Insecure or avoidant attachment
  • Feeling restless or on edge, ready to jump into fight-or flight
  • Acting impulsively or aggressively
  • Feeling nervous or anxious frequently
  • Experiencing emotional numbness
  • Having trouble focusing at school
  • Using negative coping skills, such as drug and alcohol use, self-harm and other self-destructive behaviors

How We Can Help

Solstice West is a residential treatment center that creates a supportive space for teenage girls ages 14-18 to process their trauma and grow emotionally. We take a relationship-based approach to healing from personal trauma that encourages friendship, peer support, and mentorship through group therapy and teamwork. Our treatment model incorporates adventure therapy, fitness, artistic expression, and community service to encourage normal adolescent experiences, social skills, independent living skills, and playfulness that are often restricted when experiencing significant traumatic stress.

my daughter is addicted to instagram

Is Your Daughter’s Addiction to Instagram Likes Affecting Her Ability to Feel Well-Liked?

Is Your Daughter’s Addiction to Instagram Likes Affecting Her Ability to Feel Well-Liked? 6000 4000 srtc_admin

Instagram just proposed that they would start hiding likes from other viewers in an attempt to empower users to use it as a platform of self-expression rather than self-comparison. Younger generations are more drawn to social media apps like Instagram where they can interact with celebrities, businesses, and influencers than websites like Facebook, where they share personal updates with friends and family.

As posts reach a wider audience and their feed is updated more frequently, it is not uncommon if your daughter has become addicted to scrolling through Instagram. For teens struggling with self-esteem and connection, Instagram provides the illusion of validation through likes and comments; but, the more teens post and put themselves out there online, the less connected they often feel offline.

Isn’t everyone addicted to their phone?

With smartphones, we carry access to the whole world in our hands. According to a recent New York Times article, “most people check their smartphones 150 times per day, or every six minutes.” Each time we pick up our phone, we get sucked into a vortex of selfies, articles, emails, and endless scrolling. Teens spend an average of nine hours a day staring at a screen and most of them are worried they spend too much time on their phones. Like all addictions, technology convinces us that we need it and we can’t live without the identities we’ve built online. Although technology gives us access to more information, improves productivity, and helps us to connect with others, it can have a significant impact on our self-esteem, relationships, and digital safety.

Potential Harm caused by Instagram

Social media is just another form of media that can offer fake news, unrealistic role models, and awareness of violence in society. The difference between social media and other news outlets is that it is run by users and largely unregulated, unless you are a high-profile personality. Most teens that use Instagram as a cry for help or to target others go under the radar.

The biggest problem with social media is that people feel pressure to present false, idealistic versions of themselves. Most accounts are used to glamorize your life, which can be an immediate boost to your self esteem, but forces you to keep up appearances. While more influencers are becoming vulnerable about having bad days or using photoshop, teenagers often compare themselves to the good parts of other people’s lives without realizing a picture may hide a thousand words.

Hiding likes may not protect teenagers from cyberbullying or censor the type of information they are exposed to, but it can help teenagers form an identity outside of likes. Constantly comparing yourself to others and receiving messages about what your life should look like, if only you could afford these products or have these experiences, takes a toll on one’s self-esteem and self concept. Teens feel pressure to be the person they want to be online and look for approval from others by giving into buying products and going places “for the gram.” The lack of censorship of smaller accounts can contribute to receiving hateful comments or spreading screenshots of personal information that can tear apart the unstable sense of self-esteem teens build online.

Benefits of using Instagram

It’s impossible to make your daughter avoid using Instagram altogether. Most teens have smartphones and communicate with their friends more often through social media than over text.

We don’t believe technology use should be restricted, but we encourage girls to learn how to use social media to empower themselves rather than to self-destruct.

  • Helps teens stay in touch with friends
  • Provides a way to bond over content in person or to discover you have shared interests with your peers
  • Easier than communicating in person for teens with social anxiety
  • Can be easier to reach out for support to a wider audience than to text a specific person. You never know who might respond and how supportive they might be.
  • Likes are a stamp of approval and support, even if they are easy to obsess over
  • Encourages teens to share their achievements and creativity
  • Can be a good distraction from overwhelming emotions
  • Many accounts are filled with positive messages about self-esteem and embracing who you are

It’s all about choosing who you follow and who you let follow your account. Maybe hiding likes will help get back to the real purpose of social media: forming positive connections.

Solstice West can help

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us. Many of them struggle with technology addiction that has taken a blow to their self-esteem and they have difficulty maintaining in-person relationships due to self-doubt, people-pleasing, and insecurity.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves offline and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

help for a defiant teenage daughter

Overcoming the Power Struggle: Help For A Defiant Teenage Daughter

Overcoming the Power Struggle: Help For A Defiant Teenage Daughter 6000 4000 srtc_admin

Finding help for a defiant teenage daughter can be a difficult process. With hormonal changes, it can feel like a constant power struggle. When your teen is constantly going against you or striking an argument, it is important that you don’t fuel the fire. You should understand that your teenager may be very vulnerable, dealing with school stress, and/or the pressure to fit in. These stresses can build up and cause teenagers to be defiant. Defiance in teenagers can reveal itself in a number of ways. Some of these ways can include:

  • Back-talking
  • Eye-rolling
  • Purposefully not listening
  • Disregarding rules
  • Missing curfew
  • Lying
  • Disrespectfulness

Getting Your Defiant Teenage Daughter Under Control

While you may feel alone and helpless at times, rest assured knowing that there are ways you can help your teen transition from their defiant behavior to respectful behavior. Your approach to this task has a critical role in determining whether or not they respond in a positive way. Here are some methods that can help you get your defiant teenage daughter under control:

    1. Develop self-respect. This is the first step in trying to improve your teen’s sense of respect—develop your own self-respect. Know your bottom line and stand firmly in it. Set clear expectations of how you want to be treated and hold your teen accountable. Setting limits from the beginning establishes a solid foundation to build upon.
    2. Emphasize alternative actions. A lot of times defiant teens may think their behavior or attitude is going to solve their frustrations or problems. This is simply not the case. Make sure your teen knows that yelling, eye-rolling, and being disrespectful is no way to reach a positive outcome. Teach your teen to problem solve in a more effective manner.
    3. Plan ahead. It is important that you are always equipped and prepared to handle defiant behaviors. Being overly reactive and responding in an angry outburst will only make matters worse. Come up with a plan to address the situation in a meaningful way that is seeking the best interest of your teen.
    4. Ask for help. Rest assured knowing you are not the first parent to have to deal with defiant teenage behaviors. Do not hesitate to ask for help. Seek out community resources or family and friends to help enforce expectations for your teen or to give advice when you need it. Talking to someone can be extremely helpful.

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

teen refusing to go to school

Have A Teen Refusing To Go To School? Here’s Some Tips

Have A Teen Refusing To Go To School? Here’s Some Tips 5548 3699 srtc_admin

When your teen refuses to go to school, it can cause a power struggle in your home. You may find yourself in a constant battle with them. Rest assured knowing your teen is not the first teen to engage in school refusal. Recognize that there are many underlying reasons why your teen may refuse to go to school. Here are some things to consider:

  • The pressure that comes from school may be overwhelming. Juggling academics, a social life, sports, and hobbies may become too much for your teen and not going to school to face this anxiety may be their best coping mechanism.
  • Problems at school. Perhaps your teen is being bullied or feeling isolated. If one does not feel like they fit in anywhere, they are more likely to avoid going to the place where they are reminded of that.
  • Depression, drug abuse, and/or eating disorders. There could be mental or physical symptoms that are contributing to your teens desire to stay away from school. If this could be a possibility, have them evaluated by a medical professional.

Defining School Refusal

School refusal is not to be confused with school phobia. Experts note that there is a difference between the two concepts. School phobia is fear-based. This can be linked to a fear of a specific situation or object at school. School refusal is a sign of broader anxiety- this could be separation anxiety, general anxiety, or social anxiety.

School refusal is considered an urgent situation. Therapists tend to treat school refusal as a crisis. Once you seek professional help, they will immediately work to develop a plan to address the issue at hand.

Resources for School Refusal

Ultimately, you may not have the magic key in helping your teen get in a better mindset about school. However, there are ways you can support them in trying to cope with their emotions. Help for teen refusing to go to school goes beyond the home, but that does not mean you cannot help the situation at all. Here are some ideas on how you can be supportive for your teen:

  1. Start the conversation. Ask your teen why they feel like going to school is not an option for them.
  2. Ask them how you can help. Maybe your teen needs specific help addressing a situation that is bothering them. This can also be where you determine what resources they need.
  3. Provide them with resources. As a parent, it is your job to guide them to places where they can get help immediately.

Solstice RTC can help

Solstice RTC is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice RTC is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345.