• Residential Treatment Program for Teens 14-17

Teen Girl Issues

emotional issues in teens

Parenting 101: Help for Emotional Issues in Teens

Parenting 101: Help for Emotional Issues in Teens 1866 2205 srtc_admin

The teenage years are tough. With hormonal changes, growing pains, and maturing relationships, being a teenager can be extremely overwhelming. You may feel like your teen is always on edge and perhaps “overly” emotional. You shouldn’t ignore these emotional waves. Instead, you should help your teen learn to cope with their emotions.

Let’s be honest. Sometimes it can feel like you cannot say anything right to your teen. Every question and comment can send them over the edge. They may feel like you’re being too nosey, too controlling, or overbearing. Finding a balance is tricky, because every teen responds differently. What works for one child may be a recipe for disaster for another. No one knows your child like you do, so you should first step back and address their own needs and what triggers their emotional outbursts.

Here are some things that can be sparking your teen’s emotional issues:

  • Peer pressure
  • Trouble fitting in
  • Relationship issues
  • Academic stress
  • Traumatic events
  • Self-confidence struggles

You should start a conversation with your teen and address their emotions head-on. Before you can create a way to improve their emotional state, you have to acknowledge the root of the issue.

A Few Helpful Reminders

Teenagers are oh so delicate. With this being said, the way you confront them is extremely important. Your approach determines the outcome or how they respond whether it be positive or negative.

Here are some things to keep in mind when trying to help for emotional issues in teens:

  1. Recognize that reactions are everything. If you treat the situation like it is a fire that needs to be put out, this will frighten teens and probably make the situation worse. When your teen is having a meltdown, you should step back, take a deep breath, and approach them calmly and reassure them that everything will settle.
  2. Be creative in helping them cope. Help your teen explore ways to release their emotions. Whether it be exercise, arts, crafts, or listening to music, encourage them to go to their safe space when they are feeling overwhelmed.
  3. Put things into perspective. Research shows the “glitter jar” to be a very effective model for teens to understand emotional distress. The main concept is that emotions “rise, swirl, and settle” by themselves with patience and care. Seeing a real-life model of this concept can be really beneficial for teens.
  4. Be attentive. Do not disregard your teen as overdramatic. This can make them feel neglected and crazy. Always over a listening ear. Be willing to give them advice and reassure them that emotions are normal. Ask what you can do to make things better. It is important that they know you care.

Solstice Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and able to manage their emotions. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345

where to send a defiant teenager

Where to Send a Defiant Teenager: Why Residential Treatment Works

Where to Send a Defiant Teenager: Why Residential Treatment Works 6016 4016 srtc_admin

The teenage years are tough. Sometimes as a parent it can feel like you are in a constant power struggle with your teen. Hormonal changes can result in occasional defiant behavior and a lot of attitude. However, defiant behaviors have limits. When these limits are exceeded it may be time to make decisions about where to send a defiant teenager that will help your teen and your family as a whole. This can be a difficult decision to make as a parent, but you are not alone. Seeking professional help may be just what your child needs to get themselves back on track to a more successful future.

Your next thought may be: I don’t know where to send a defiant teenager. The answer may be a residential treatment center. Before you disregard the idea, you should learn more of what this type of treatment can do for teens.

Why Residential Treatment?

If you don’t know where to send a defiant teenager, a residential treatment center may be the best fit for your teen. You should not hesitate in seeking professional advice to offer resources to therapeutic programs as such. Residential treatment centers can be very beneficial for teens who struggle with defiant behavior. Here is how:

  • Residential treatment centers pull the individual from the chaos, distractions, and perhaps triggers that surround them in their everyday lives which helps them to focus on improving their behaviors.
  • The relationship-based approach within residential treatment allows your teen to work on relational struggles. This type of approach is helpful in giving your teen the skills they need to transition back to the relationships they have at home.
  • A holistic approach is taken through residential treatment. This basically means the teenager is addressed as a whole rather than simply identifying the issue or behavioral issue. The teen is able to look at themselves as a whole and work on self-improvement altogether.

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center can help

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center is a program for teen girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues related to anxiety, depression, trauma, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides three types of therapy: individual, group, and family therapy. Solstice Residential Treatment Center is dedicated to teaching young women how to incorporate healthy habits into their lives using a wholistic approach. Students will leave with the skills they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, and healthy. We can help your family today!

Contact us at 866-278-3345.

risky teen behavior

Risky Teen Behaviors: Differences Between Positive and Negative Risks

Risky Teen Behaviors: Differences Between Positive and Negative Risks 640 426 Solstice RTC

The teenage years are the years in which one develops the desire to fit in. This desire may come with a high cost. During the adolescent years, opportunity and risk seem all the more appealing. A maturational imbalance may prevent teens from good decision-making during this period in their lives as well. While learning from our silly mistakes is an important part of growing up, teens still need guidance on how to better navigate themselves away from risky behavior and towards a rewarding future. First, one must learn the difference between positive and negative risks. Here are some defining characteristics:

Positive risks: benefits an individual’s well-being, legal, socially acceptable, does not present severe negative consequences

Negative risks: harmful towards an individual’s well-being, illegal, socially unacceptable, may have severe consequences

The Risks Our Teens Should Take

As puberty hits so does a new wave of potential risks. As a parent, it is important to acknowledge these risks and learn to address them head on with your child. It is your job to put an emphasis on the good as a way to prevent the bad. First, you should know your child and their risky behaviors. Here are some signs that indicate that your child is a positive risk taker:

  • Internalizes family values
  • Has strong bonds to society
  • Possesses important socially-desirable long-term goals (academic or other)
  • Feels they have more to lose by taking negative risks
  • Is influenced by peers who take positive risks

The Four Friendly Risk Types

As a parent you should constantly suggest new ways to take positive risks for your teen. This starts with a conversation and then you can help them put it into action. Physical, social, academic, and extracurricular risks are a couple of categories you should consider talking with your teen able. What they are drawn to will vary based off of their personal interests. Here’s some ideas to get you started:

Physical Risks:

  • Try a new sport
  • Pursue a new fitness goal

Social Risks:

  • Spend time with a new group of people
  • Arrive at a party without knowing anyone
  • Attend a summer camp without friends
  • Attend a rally and hold up a sign 
  • Stand up for something you believe in at school even if it is unpopular
  • Pursue a new friendship with the risk of rejection

Academic Risks:

  • Sign up for a challenging AP course
  • Take a class you know nothing about
  • Join a club that interests you
  • Run for a school office position

Extracurricular Risks:

  • Adopt a new hobby
  • Learn to play an instrument
  • Start your own babysitting business or dog walking
  • Set goals to read more in your free time

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center Can Help

Solstice West Residential Treatment Center is a program for young girls ages 14-18 who struggle with issues such as anxiety, depression, trauma, addictive behaviors, and/or relationship struggles. This program provides individual, group, and family therapy to help students heal and improve from every angle. Fitness, nutrition, and academics also play an important role in this program. Solstice gives young women the skills and help they need to transition into the world feeling confident, happy, healthy, and capable. We can help your family today!

Contact us at (866) 278-3345

Self Identity in Teens: Social Media Is Getting in the Way

Self Identity in Teens: Social Media Is Getting in the Way 1280 854 Solstice RTC

The shaping of self identity in teens is one of the most important and most vulnerable processes of our lives. The self identity that we build during the adolescent years follows us into adulthood, which makes it an extremely critical period of time. Social media could be negatively affecting it, though.

We live in a world where nearly every teenager has access to social media, whether it’s through their own device, a friend’s, or a shared one at home. This level of connectivity has opened many doors in the way of communication, but it has also brought about questions of the negative impact it can have on forming minds.

Social media can negatively impact young girls

self identity in teensSocial media is largely based on looks. We already know that the images and expectations depicted by the media can be incredibly harmful on a young girl’s forming mind, social media just makes it easier to pass along those messages.

While social media is an inspirational and revolutionary means of connecting with others, focusing on appearances is never good for a girl’s mental health–and that’s exactly what social media tends to focus on and “reward” with likes.

Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook (just to name a few) are among the most used social media platforms by adolescents, and they all heavily rely on the approval of others through “likes” and comments.

If self identity in teens is based on how many “likes” you receive on a post, then there’s always going to be someone who has more, and for that person, there’s always going to be someone who has more, and so on. It’s a vicious cycle that makes absolutely no sense.

Many teen girls strive to get the coolest and most perfect photos just for their online presence to appear “active” and “fun”–even if they’re not actually having fun in real life. This type of behavior and thinking can lead to mental health issues like depression or anxiety.

Self identity in teens needs to be nourished and built by more than just “likes” and shares on social media. As parents, it’s our job to step in and offer support if we notice our child isn’t basing their self-worth on things that truly matter.

If you believe your daughter truly is struggling, it’s imperative to reach out to a professional for guidance.

Solstice is here for your daughter

Solstice is a groundbreaking residential treatment center for girls, ages 14 to 18. Our girls often grapple with depression, issues with self identity in teens, low self-esteem, anxiety, trauma, ADHD, and other emotional or behavioral problems when they come to us.

Through a unique combination of therapeutic programs based upon both traditional and holistic mental health treatment, we treat our clients with age and gender specific techniques. We strive to empower teenage women with the ability to believe in themselves and provide the tools and motivation required to instill these beliefs for life.

For more information about how we help self identity in teens at Solstice, please contact us at (866) 278-3345.

Beating Trauma with Trauma Focused CBT

Beating Trauma with Trauma Focused CBT 150 150 Solstice RTC

Trauma is a part of life. It comes in many different shapes and sizes, from national tragedies to personal hardships – and, whatever the cause, can leave a trail of pain in its wake. Trauma knows no age restrictions either: as a matter of fact, studies estimate that up to 43% of children experience trauma, with 3%-15% of girls consequently developing symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Trauma focused CBT is often utilized to help treat PTSD. 

If left untreated, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can cause a child to experience mood swings, become isolated, and constantly relive the experience. In extreme cases, it can even lead to severe problems such as substance use, dangerous behaviors, and poor school performance. As a parent of a child with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, it can sometimes be hard to know what to do. One moment, your daughter can seem normal; the next, she becomes a complete stranger. And, what’s worse, sometimes the origin of this trauma isn’t obvious. 

Fortunately, there is good news. Although Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can be difficult, there are ways to treat and overcome it. There are numerous approaches – all of which are available at residential treatment centers for trauma – including, among others, EMDR, neurofeedback, somatic experiencing, Trauma-Focused Equine Assisted Psychotherapy, and Trauma-Focused CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy).

Ways Trauma-Focused CBT Can Help Your Daughter

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is one of the most effective approaches at helping children who are coping with trauma. One of the benefits of Trauma Focused CBT is its unique focus on helping the entire family deal with the aftereffects of trauma. As a holistic approach, Trauma Focused CBT doesn’t merely attempt to cure the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; instead, its primary purpose is to help heal the mind, body, and spirit. Where only too many approaches are content with brushing the problem under the rug, Trauma Focused CBT centers on the underlying problem. By helping your daughter overcome the root of the problem, Trauma Focused CBT offers one of the most comprehensive solutions to dealing with trauma.

At the heart of Trauma Focused CBT is building an environment in which your daughter can feel safe. With the aid of the therapy, a child receives the necessary support to be able to discuss their traumatic experience. Openly talking about the issue allows therapists to guide the struggling children toward reevaluating the misconstrued beliefs that stem from the trauma.

Moreover, Trauma Focused CBT works in conjunction with the family. By utilizing a relationship-based approach (one that forms bonds between the child, the parent, and the therapist), Trauma Focused CBT allows a “therapeutic alliance” to be formed. The trust and respect shown on all sides of the balance are vital elements of the healing process both for the struggling child and for the adults affected by their children’s troubles.

It is also important to note that Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is more than a theoretical approach; in fact, it is a hands-on journey to a healthy future. The skills learned in Trauma Focused CBT last a lifetime.

Solstice RTC can help

If your teen girl is struggling with emotional or behavioral difficulties due to a trauma-related issue, Solstice can help her find success.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.

Putting the Pieces Back Together: Helping Your Daughter through the Effects of Trauma in Teens

Putting the Pieces Back Together: Helping Your Daughter through the Effects of Trauma in Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

As far as adults are concerned, childhood is the best time of a person’s life. Unfortunately, for a large number of teens, that is not the case. For some, the culprit is simply puberty. For up to 43% of children, however, the issue is more serious – 15%-43% of girls experience trauma, with a further 3%-15% developing symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The effects of trauma in teens can be dramatic and harsh.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is one of the most extreme effects of trauma in teens; however, there are many effects of trauma in teens that could potentially develop. Perhaps one of the most important things to note is the fact that the effects of trauma in teens are as “real” as that of a veteran following a war. All trauma is different and there is no one-size-fits-all approach to curing the effects of trauma in teens. It is also important to note that trauma can take a number of forms – from personal tragedies to national disasters. There is no trauma that is too small to cause a problem.

Recognizing the Effects of Trauma in Teens

As a parent of a child suffering the effects of trauma in teens, the first step to making the problem better, is to recognize it exists. Often, parents find it difficult to admit that their child is struggling with a mental issue. In order to begin the healing process, though, it is vital that these effects addressed. 

The effects of trauma in teens can vary in severity. In virtually all cases, though, trauma in teens combine both the effects of trauma in younger children with those of adults. In other words, teenagers get the worst of both worlds. Typically, the effects of trauma in teens include fear, anger, withdrawal, and isolation. Suffering from trauma may cause your child to exhibit reckless and dangerous behaviors. Depression, hopelessness, and flawed reconstruction of memories can also be a consequence of trauma.

Ways to Help Your Child Overcome the Effects of Trauma in Teens

If you see signs of trauma in your child, the sooner you get help, the better. If left untreated, the effects of trauma in teens can linger and cause problems all the way into adulthood. Some tips to remember include:

  • Listen. Opening lines of communication with your struggling child will allow you to support them through this difficult time. If your child feels safe approaching you to discuss the problem, you will be better-equipped to help it.
  • Don’t judge. Trauma doesn’t even have to be experienced personally. While marital problems in someone else’s family may not seem serious to you, they may be devastating for your child.
  • Stay positive. Showing your child that you are worried only makes the effects of trauma in teens worse.
  • Keep a routine. Trauma may cause a child to lose appetite or sleep. Staying healthy is key to preventing the effects of trauma in teens from taking over.
  • Consider professional help. It may be difficult for symptoms to go away on their own. If your child exhibits the effects of trauma in teens, it could be time to contact a professional.

Solstice RTC can help

Solstice RTC, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling daughter find success.

For more information about Solstice RTC, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Working Through Emotional Struggles in Teens

Working Through Emotional Struggles in Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

Ah, puberty. The time when every problem seems like the end of the world. And the time when a child begins discovering their individuality. Unfortunately, growing up is never easy – not for the child, and especially not for the parent. With puberty often come disagreements, difficult days, and moments when your child can be downright cruel.

On the other hand, puberty is the time when your child slowly morphs into their adult self. This transitional period shapes who your child will be; with this in mind, it is extremely important for the parent to be available even if (when) the going gets tough. While it may occasionally be tempting to give up, there are several tips to help deal with the emotional struggles in teens.

Signs of Emotional Struggles in Teens

There are many outward signs of emotional struggles in teens. While no two cases are the same and the emotional struggles in teens can vary from person to person, several typical patterns frequently emerge. Some teens may express anger or sadness. Mood swings and rapid changes in appearance or friend groups could be indicators of inner turmoil. Also, many teens are tempted to try alcohol or drugs, especially as a response to stress. The first step to recognizing emotional struggles in teens is to educate yourself to the form they may take in your child. 

emotional struggles in teens

Image source: Flickr user- tree_leaf_clover

Another thing to keep in mind is that the teenage brain is different from the brain of an adult. Recklessness, for instance, is a natural part of development – with the problem potentially worsened by the presence of emotional struggles in teens. Emotional struggles in teens are not a reflection of the parent; they are, in most cases, simply a phase.

When dealing with emotional struggles in teens, remember to:

  • Watch for substance use and mental illness. Much of the time, emotional struggles in teens will pass with age. However, in some cases, emotional struggles in teens mask a deeper issue. If your child’s behavior lasts for extended periods of time or you suspect your child is using drugs or drinking alcohol, it may be time to consider professional assistance.
  • Set an example. As much as teenagers would hate to admit it, they look up to the parents. By being a role model, you encourage your teen to try to emulate your actions – just make sure not to set impossible expectations!
  • Listen. Opening up lines of communication with your child will allow them to approach you when they need help. Emotional struggles in teens can be lonely; if you are there for your teen when they need you, they are more likely to share their feelings in the future.
  • Have fun together. Often, parents forget that their children have interests that may differ from their own. Bonding over an activity that is fun for both you and your child will allow you to gently guide your child onto a healthy path.
  • Stay positive. While parenting a teen may hurt, in the end, keeping a good attitude is crucial to helping your teen become a well-adjusted adult.

Solstice RTC can help

Solstice RTC, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling daughter find success.

For more information about Solstice RTC, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Building Confidence: Fun Self Esteem Activities for Teens

Building Confidence: Fun Self Esteem Activities for Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

In today’s electronic-centered world, teens encounter one impossible standard after another. What’s worse, while back in the day there was simple reflection time without the intrusion of a screen, today the constant bombardment of information is seemingly inescapable. Between not having truly private moments and trying to live up to what the media glamorizes, it is no surprise that kids of today have more difficulty than ever building a positive image of themselves. Fortunately, as a parent, there are numerous self-esteem activities for teens that can help set them back on track.

Ideas for Self Esteem Activities for Teens

The most important thing to remember when exploring new self esteem activities for teens, is that it’s about your child. Moreover, it may require you several attempts to find the activities your teen enjoys, as opposed to the ones you think your teen will enjoy. Another thing to keep in mind, is that positive self-esteem activities for teens begin at home: no matter how much character you build doing various tasks, at the end of the day, encouraging your child and letting them know they are special the way they are will build a foundation for their self-esteem.  

Some fun self-esteem activities for teens can include ones that allow them to test their individuality or learn to rely on themselves. Part of building self-esteem and confidence is leaving the comfort zone – but not too far at first. Physical activities, such as sports or hiking, can be a healthy way to make your child feel empowered. Encouraging your kids to try themselves at various forms of artistic expression – many schools offer extracurricular activities to that end – may help them discover a hidden talent or passion. In the end, remind your children that nobody is an expert at first; learning to do new things is half the experience.

Solstice can help

Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter find success. Solstice helps girls struggling with behavioral and emotional difficulties such as self esteem issues, depression, anxiety, and trauma. For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Instant Gratification Times 1000: Teaching Your Teen Impulse Control

Instant Gratification Times 1000: Teaching Your Teen Impulse Control 150 150 Solstice RTC

Sometimes it seems that teens have the impulse control of a, well, teenager. One moment, they seem like rational human beings and then they do something so incredibly reckless, you cannot help but wonder what they were thinking. Fortunately, there’s a scientific answer: it’s all about the brain.

Educating Your Teen about Impulse Control

The teenage brain is still in the process of developing. This process not only leads to teenagers pushing boundaries and searching for individuality; it promotes risk-taking behaviors with little regard for consequence. The behaviors can range from mood issues resulting in confrontation and “borrowing” without asking, to substance abuse, kleptomania, compulsive sexuality, and many others.

As a parent of a teen with impulse control issues, there are several steps that you can take to make the problem easier. Typically, impulse control comes with age; however, a few tips can help relieve tension until that time comes. The most important thing to remember is to stay positive. As with many other situations, by losing your temper, you only add fuel to the fire; what could have been a calm discussion turns into a power struggle. 

Try to keep communication open. While it may be tempting for a parent to simply lay down the law, a real conversation is a two-way street. Setting a strict system of cause-and-effect (break the rules, deal with the consequences) does not teach your child why impulse control is important; sitting down and talking about the effect of recklessness does. Even though there are situations when remaining patient can prove difficult, in the end, the best way to teach your child impulse control is to exhibit impulse control yourself.

In some cases, impulse control issues may be symptoms of a deeper problem such as ADHD or anxiety. If your teen exhibits behaviors that could point to something else or your teen’s impulse control issues are getting out of hand, it may be time to consider professional help.

Solstice can help

If your teen is struggling with controlling their impulsive behavior, Solstice can help. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral issues like defiance, ADHD, substance use, and trauma.

For more information about how Solstice can help your teen, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

Words Louder Than Actions: Dealing with a Nonverbal Learning Disorder

Words Louder Than Actions: Dealing with a Nonverbal Learning Disorder 150 150 Solstice RTC

Asperger’s Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and Nonverbal Learning Disorder may simply be three types of an overarching issue, some scientists say. While there is no agreement in the scientific community (yet) about whether or not the statement is true, there are definite similarities between the three.

Signs of a Nonverbal Learning Disorder

Sometimes described as the opposite of dyslexia – an incorrect statement, but one that can be used to for the purposes of making an analogy – Nonverbal Learning Disorder is a condition in which a child has difficulty grasping concepts, relationships, ideas, and patterns, while not having trouble reading, decoding language, or memorizing material. Other patterns unique to a child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder include problems with spatial awareness, social communication, and fine motor skills. In some cases, Nonverbal Learning Disorder causes the child to repeat questions and take everything very literally.nonverbal learning disorder

As a parent, there are several steps that you can take to help deal with your child’s Nonverbal Learning Disorder. The first is to keep the environment as familiar as possible. Often, children with Nonverbal Learning Disorder have an aversion to new situations. By being as specific, logical, and organized as possible, you will minimize the levels of stress your child feels. Nonverbal Learning Disorder requires a routine – sticking to it helps your child focus on other things instead of being distracted by shifts in what they expect.

Another important factor is helping your child with Nonverbal Learning Disorder build confidence and self-esteem. Gently introducing them to safe social situations can teach your child to be more open while interacting with others. It may also prove useful to talk to teachers and school officials – explaining your situation will help the classroom be a more pleasant experience.

When raising a child with a learning disorder, it can also be helpful to contact professionals who will help your child adjust to everyday life.

Solstice can help

If your teen is struggling behavioral and emotional issues stemming from a learning disorder, Solstice can help guide them on a path towards success. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with difficulties such as trauma, depression, ADHD, and substance use.

For more information about how Solstice can help your daughter reach her fullest potential, please call  (866) 278-3345 today!