• Residential Treatment Program for Teens 14-17

Teen Girl Issues

World Wide Addiction: Internet Addiction Disorder in teens

World Wide Addiction: Internet Addiction Disorder in teens 850 567 Solstice RTC

Although “Internet Addiction Disorder” might sound like a fake illness invented by a pampered generation, the truth is far more dangerous. Research shows that Internet Addiction Disorder carries with it all the same gravity as any other addiction – down to the way in which dopamine functions in the brain. In other words, Internet Addiction Disorder affects the mind in a manner similar to controlled substances.

Culture vs. Addiction

Since Internet Addiction Disorder is such a new concept, it is easy to misinterpret. Simply going online multiple times a day does not necessarily constitute Internet Addiction Disorder, just like a teen suffering the disorder might not be online 24 hours a day (although, chances are, they will make every effort be). The difference is in the impact. 

To qualify as Internet Addiction Disorder, internet use must turn into a compulsion with withdrawal effects if it is forcefully limited. Lying about being on the internet, the inability to control online behavior, and compulsive use are symptoms of the issue. Typically, when a teen has Internet Addiction Disorder, they will only be happy when “using” – as such, their non-digital life (including social interactions, school performance, and relationships) will take a heavy toll. Moreover, like with many other drugs, the teen might lose track of time while on the computer.

Back to Reality

As a parent, there are several steps that can be taken to bring your child back to our world. While making your teen quit cold turkey looks good on paper, in reality, it is likely to cause them to lash back. Instead, try gradually decreasing your teen’s smartphone and computer use and implementing a healthy routine. By encouraging your teen to be active and social, you will organically take away the time they could be spending on the computer.

Internet Addiction Disorder is sometimes a result of outside difficulties – for instance, stress, family problems, and school troubles; remember to communicate with your teen about what might be causing the underlying problem.

If your teen’s Internet Addiction Disorder gets out of hand, it might be time to consider professional help.

S0lstice can help

If your daughter is constantly hooked to her phone and is struggling with addictive behavioral issues, consider Solstice as an option. Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, helps struggling teens find success.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345!

Is your daughter not sleeping enough? Five Signs of Sleep Deprivation In Teens

Is your daughter not sleeping enough? Five Signs of Sleep Deprivation In Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

Does your teen constantly complain about not getting enough sleep? Does she stay up past midnight trying to get homework completed? If so, she’s probably sleep deprived. Sleep deprivation in teens can affect pretty much every aspect of your teen’s life. If your teen isn’t getting enough sleep she’s at a higher risk of behavioral, academic, and emotional issues.

How do I know if my teen isn’t catching enough zzzs?

Sometimes it’s hard to tell when your teen has actually gone to bed. She might stay up into the early hours of the morning on her phone or watching TV in her room with the door closed. What are some of the symptoms of sleep deprivation in teens? Here are some signs of sleep deprivation to look out for: 

  • They are feeling stressed out all the time: If your teen gets stressed over simple tasks, that may be a sign they are not getting enough sleep. Sleep deprivation makes it hard for people to deal with daily challenges and annoyances, like doing chores or homework.
  • Having issues with memory: During deep sleep, your nerve cells make connections that help boost memory. If your teen has to choose between studying late at night before an exam and sleep, they should choose sleep every time. Getting enough sleep will help them do better on that test than an extra hour or two of studying will.
  • Poor decision making: If your teen is getting involved in risky behavior like substance use or cheating on tests, sleep deprivation may be to blame. In the brain, the prefrontal cortex is responsible for judgment and controlling impulsive behavior. The less sleep your teen gets, the more impulsive they will likely be.
  • Unable to Concentrate: Another sign of sleep deprivation in teens is an inability to concentrate. If your teen can’t concentrate in school or when you’re trying to talk to them about something, it may be because they haven’t been getting enough sleep.
  • Mood Swings: Is your daughter go from zero to sixty mood-wise on a regular basis? The reason for her mood swings might be sleep deprivation. Children who sleep less than the amount they’re supposed to are 25 percent more likely to misbehave.

If it’s not just sleep deprivation in teens

If your teen daughter’s behavioral struggles are caused by something more than sleep deprivation in teens, consider Solstice. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties like trauma, depression, anxiety, and disordered eating.

For more information about Solstice, please call  (866) 278-3345.

Why Send Your Daughter to a Residential Treatment Center for Girls?

Why Send Your Daughter to a Residential Treatment Center for Girls? 150 150 Solstice RTC

We’ve all heard the horror stories. Military-style boot camps. “Scared Straight” programs.

But this couldn’t be farther from the truth.

In reality, a residential treatment center for girls is an environment specifically geared toward giving your child a safe space. Growing up is never easy, but with the aid of caring professionals, your daughter will be able to work through her issues. residential treatment center for girls

Benefits of a Residential Treatment Center for Girls

A residential treatment center for girls offers many ways in which to guide your daughter back on track. The most common reasons for considering a residential treatment center for girls include:

  • Helping your daughter’s problems. Outward behavior often reflects inner turmoil. For instance – and this is merely one example – it is easy to write school refusal off as stubbornness. However, chances are, there’s an underlying cause. A residential treatment center for girls specializes in identifying and confronting these problems.
  • Treatment for mental illness. Puberty is especially difficult for those struggling with a mental disorder. At a residential treatment center for girls, if your daughter struggles with such a condition, on-staff psychiatrists well help her learn that she is not defined by her illness.
  • Building family relationships. A residential treatment center for girls focuses on teaching your child how to bond with the rest of the family. The ultimate goal is, after all, to make your daughter better-equipped to encounter the world – by strengthening her ties to the ones close to her, she will be ready for anything to come.
  • Getting back the daughter you love. Sometimes, seemingly overnight, the child you know can turn into a complete stranger. No matter how hard you try, everything sets her off – and you watch her slip into dangerous, reckless behaviors. At a residential treatment center for girls, your daughter will be helped along a path towards success.

Consider Solstice

Solstice is a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties. Solstice can help your daughter reach her fullest potential.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345 today!

A Damaging Emotional Outlet: Identifying Self Harm In Teens

A Damaging Emotional Outlet: Identifying Self Harm In Teens 150 150 Solstice RTC

In today’s high schools, teens are experiencing an extreme amount of stress. They are pressured to do well in school and excel in extracurriculars, all while having an active social life. Getting into a good university is more difficult than it has ever been in the past. Because of this, teens are turning to outlets to relieve this stress. For some, these outlets come in healthier forms like daily exercise and art. However, others turn to substance use and even self harm. Self harm in teens is a way for some people to get fast acting relief when they are feeling extremely stressed. Knowing if your daughter is self harming can be hard. Being able to identify the signs of self harm in teens allows you to take the appropriate preventative measures. 

How can I identify self harm in teens?

Spotting the signs of self harm in your daughter is the first step to getting her the help she needs. The following are symptoms of self harm in teens

  • Marks on their skin that may have come from cutting or burning
  • Hidden objects in their room that they may use to cut or burn themselves such as knives, razors, lighters, or box cutters.
  • Locking herself away for hours on end after coming home from an upsetting day at school.
  • Someone else (such as another adult, sibling, or friend of your daughter) reports seeing cuts or burns on your teen’s body.
  • Your teen covers themselves up with long sleeves and pants even in hot weather.

How do I help my teen?

Talking to your teen about their self injurious behavior is not easy. Here are a few tips for helping a teen who self harms:

  • Don’t be judgmental: Judging your teen for harming themselves will only make the situation much worse.
  • Find out what the issue is: Try to understand why your teen has resorted to self harm. This can help you see your teen’s struggles through their eyes.
  • Start a conversation: Opening the lines of communication with your teen during this difficult time can help them express to you what they’re feeling in a positive way.
  • Be supportive: Don’t overreact and punish or threaten your teen because of their self harming behaviors. Instead, let your teen know that you’re there to support them and can talk to them anytime they would feel comfortable reaching out to you.
  • Find professional support: Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter get the therapeutic support she needs.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.

 

Transforming teenage rebellion into respect

Transforming teenage rebellion into respect 150 150 Solstice RTC

Teenage rebellion can take its toll on everyone in a teen’s life. Rebellious teens want things their way and won’t listen to anyone else around them. Helping your teen build a sense of respect and responsibility for their actions is an extremely challenging task.

What causes teenage rebellion?

Teenage rebellion is caused by a variety of elements. These include:

  • Hormones: Teens are going through drastic hormonal changes. With a surge of hormones coursing through their body, teens have all sorts of mood swings and changes in their overall personality.
  • Soul searching: Sometimes teens act out because they are trying to figure out who are as individuals. That may lead them down a path towards rebellion towards what they believe are overly strict rules. Teens are constantly learning more about who they are and reshaping their identity to fit that persona they believe best suits them.
  • Giving into peer pressure: Sometimes teenage rebellion stems from your teen wanting to fit in with people they believe to be “cool”. If their friends are engaging in rebellious and dangerous activities like substance use and promiscuous sexual activities, they will follow their example. 
    teenage rebellion

    Image source: Flickr user- deeeepjoy

How can I turn teenage rebellion into respect?

  1. Show respect for your teen: Your teen will never respect you unless you respect your teen. Complimenting your teen on their accomplishments will make them feel better about themselves and improve your relationship with them.
  2. Openly communicate: Understanding what’s going on in your teen’s life to lead them to rebel can improve your relationship with them. Your teen needs to know that you’re there for them even though they are rebelling against you.
  3. Have a clear set of rules and consequences: Your teen needs to understand that their rebellious behavior comes at a price. They need to be made clearly aware of your expectations of them. Through clear expectations, your teen will know when to rein in their behavior.
  4. Remember that you’re in charge: No matter how much your teen thinks they can break your rules, you need to remember that you have a position of authority over them. Don’t ever be your teen’s best friend. You’re their role model and someone they should look up to.

Solstice can help

If teenage rebellion is taking over your life, consider getting professional help for your teen. Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, helps teen girls struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties find success.

For more information about Solstice, call today at (866) 278-3345.

Being a great role model: Mentoring youth in a positive way

Being a great role model: Mentoring youth in a positive way 150 150 Solstice RTC

January is National Mentor Month. For many young people, having a mentor in their life can greatly improve their overall motivation and self esteem. If someone is there who pushes you to be productive and work hard, you’re more likely to do well. For teen girls especially, having a role model to look up to can reshape the way they see the world and their overall behavior in an extremely positive way. But how can you forge such a strong bond with your own daughter? For girls struggling with trauma or other emotional and behavioral difficulties, being able to trust someone to such an intense degree can be hard. However, mentoring youth who have such difficulties is definitely do-able.

Building trust and strong bonds by mentoring youth

For many young people, having an inspiring mentor can help them grow as individuals both personally and professionally. Mentoring youth doesn’t have to entail a huge time commitment or a great amount of resources. Here’s a few tips on how to work on creating an effective mentoring relationship with your teen daughter: 

mentoring youth

Image source: Flickr user- gareth1953

  • Don’t force the connection: If your daughter doesn’t want to build a relationship with you, she won’t. In order for the mentorship to actually work, the bond between the two of you has to be 100 percent genuine. That means, both parties have to agree to spending time together.
  • Practice what you preach: If you’re teaching your daughter about the right way to do something, make sure it’s actually something you are doing yourself. For example, if you’re teaching her how to live a healthier lifestyle, try being healthy yourself. She won’t believe anything you say if you don’t carry out those actions in your own life.
  • Be a positive coach: Positive coaching is when a mentor helps a young person achieve specific goals for the purpose of growth. Studies have shown that positive coaching can help young people better deal with stress and achieve their goals.
  • Be open with your daughter: In order for your daughter to truly trust you, you need to open up to her about your own life experiences. You have to be willing to be vulnerable in order for your daughter to open up to you about her own thoughts and feelings.

Solstice rebuilds relationships

Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your struggling daughter reach her fullest potential. We believe in fostering positive, trusting relationships between teen girls, their families, and other loved ones. 

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.

Shyness or Social Anxiety in Teens? Symptoms and Triggers

Shyness or Social Anxiety in Teens? Symptoms and Triggers 150 150 Solstice RTC

Struggling to fit in with people your own age as a teen girl is terrible. Most teen girls base their entire lives around their social life. They make it a higher priority than spending time with their family and  or even doing well academically. For some teen girls, this social life is not an option. Social anxiety in teens can be absolutely crippling in many aspects of a teen’s life. Unlike the self consciousness most people feel from time to time, social anxiety in teens creates a fear of social situations that is so intense people avoid all situations that might trigger the fear response.

What are some of these triggers?

Social anxiety in teens is actually pretty common. However, the social situations that trigger social anxiety can be very different. Some of these triggers include:

  • being the center of attention
  • meeting new people
  • making small talk
  • being criticized or teased
  • speaking with authority figures
  • public speaking

How can you tell if your teen has social anxiety?

Just because your teen occasionally gets nervous when she’s in social situations doesn’t mean she necessarily has social anxiety. Many people are shy or self-conscious—at least from time to time—but it doesn’t get in the way of their everyday functioning. Social anxiety in teens, on the other hand, does get in the way of a teen’s normal routine and can cause tremendous distress. That’s why it’s important to note symptoms of social anxiety in teens:

  • Fear that others will notice nervousness
  • Fear of humiliation and being watched by others
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Reddened face
  • Nausea or upset stomach

Solstice can help

Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, can help your daughter struggling with social anxiety. Solstice helps girls struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties such as depression, anxiety, and eating issues. For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.

More than a bad mood: Helping your teen through teen depression

More than a bad mood: Helping your teen through teen depression 150 150 Solstice RTC

Teenagers experience a whirlwind of emotion on a daily basis. That’s why, for a lot of parents of teens, slamming doors and shouting matches can become a frequent occurrence. Occasional acting out and bad moods are pretty much expected from teens. Teen depression is completely different from any of these “usual” teen behaviors. Depression can make your teen’s life absolutely miserable, causing an overwhelming sense of anger, sadness, and despair.

What are some symptoms of teen depression?

Teen depression is a serious mental health problem that can completely change the way your teen feels, behaves, and thinks. It’s not something that can be overcome by the strength of one’s will power and it should be taken extremely seriously. That’s why parents should be on the lookout for symptoms of teen depression. Although depression can occur at any point in a person’s life, symptoms of depression in adults and teen depression can be very different. The following are signs of teen depression:

  1. Behavioral Changes– Your teen may experience changes in behavior, such as:
    • A lack of energy
    • Changes in eating and sleeping patterns
    • Not caring about their appearance
    • Doing poorly in school
    • Slowed speech and body movements
    • Isolating themselves from friends and other loved ones
    • Acting impulsively
    • Alcohol and drug use
    • Self harm
  2. Emotional Changes– Watch out for the following changes in your teen’s emotions:
    • Feelings of sadness
    • Low self esteem
    • Feeling that life is bleak
    • Trouble focusing, making decisions, and with memory
    • Irritable mood
    • Feelings of hopelessness

How can I help my depressed teen?

Talking with your depressed teen about what they’re going through can be tough. Here are some pointers to help you through this conversation:

  1. Validate her feelings. Acknowledge that your teen is going through some tough feelings, even if they may seem irrational to you. Your teen needs to know that you support them one hundred percent through whatever they’re going through.
  2. Listen to your teen without lecturing them. If your teen does open up to you about what they’re going through, listen to them very carefully. It’s a huge step for your teen to be communicating with you about their feelings in the first place. Don’t pass any judgment or offer them unsolicited advice.
  3. Be respectful of your teen. Your teen may not want to talk to you at first about their depression. Be persistent in telling them how much you would like to hear from them, in a respectful and understanding fashion.
  4. Accentuate the positive. Notice the positive things your teen does. Instead of focusing on an idealized image of what you think your daughter should be like, focus on the good things your daughter does on a daily basis. This will give her a bit of a mood lift every day.

Solstice can help

If your daughter is struggling with teen depression, Solstice can help. Solstice is a residential treatment center for teens ages 14-18 struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties like teen depression, anxiety, and trauma.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.

 

The Mind-Body Connection: Benefits of Yoga for Teen Girls

The Mind-Body Connection: Benefits of Yoga for Teen Girls 150 150 Solstice RTC

For some teens, stress can pretty much take over their lives. When this happens, they are at a greater risk for developing serious mental health issues like depression and anxiety. You might be wondering what you can do to help your daughter work through this stress and live a happier, more relaxed life. Yoga might be the answer for them. The benefits of yoga for teen girls are numerous and can improve your teen’s overall wellbeing.

Benefits of yoga for teen girls

Yoga, which combines strength and flexibility exercises with relaxation and mindfulness techniques, has been shown to serve a preventative role in adolescent mental health. Benefits of yoga for teen girls include: 

  1. Improving general body awareness- Yoga allows girls to explore what shape their bodies can take. At an age where their bodies are changing rapidly, yoga helps girls understand the ways their bodies can move and grow stronger. Body awareness can help girls learn to truly respect and value their bodies which can be emotionally beneficial.
  2. Helping alleviate stress- Yoga involves rhythmic breathing and stretching, which gives teens a natural way to relieve stress. Proper breathing techniques help girls relax and let go of their worries as they practice yoga.
  3. Promoting a positive body image- When girls get in touch with their bodies through yoga, they can feel so much better about themselves overall. Yoga helps girls experience their own body strength, and for many girls, feeling stronger can help avoid feelings of self consciousness.
  4. Building self esteem- Yoga focuses on self improvement and teens measure their progress against what their own goals are.
  5. Boosting self confidence- Yoga provides a healthy environment for teens to learn about themselves without negative influence, such as images promoting a certain body image in the media. This healthy atmosphere helps bolster a girl’s positive sense of self and improves self confidence.

 

 

 

Solstice can help

If your daughter is struggling with anxiety or depression, Solstice can help guide her on a journey towards success. Solstice, a residential treatment center for teen girls ages 14-18, helps struggling girls work through emotional and behavioral difficulties utilizing a comprehensive therapeutic approach.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.

 

Getting Your Daughter Back: Five Tips For Improving Communication with your teen

Getting Your Daughter Back: Five Tips For Improving Communication with your teen 150 150 Solstice RTC

Now that your daughter is in her teen years, you may feel like she’s becoming more and more distant. The lines of communication are probably slowly coming apart and you’re probably wondering how to get back the sweet daughter you know is inside that angsty, isolated person in front of you. Improving communication with your teen is one of the key ways to improve your relationship with your daughter.

Where to start?

You may be confused as where to even begin reconnecting with your daughter. Here are a few steps you can take for improving communication with your teen:

  1. Don’t get emotional: This is one of the hardest things a parent can do. After all, your child is the most precious part of your life. When you’re trying to get through to your teen who may be having difficulties with behavioral or emotional struggles, it’s important to remember that your job is to be their parent, and not to get frustrated with your teen. 
    improving communication with your teen

    Image source: Flickr user- clemente

  2. Be curious, don’t interrogate: Instead of asking your teen what they did on a daily basis with the tone of a drill sergeant, actually be curious about what they are up to. Listen to what they have to say and don’t interrupt with your opinion. Teens need a connection with you, as their parent, so connect with them on a level that they can understand.
  3. Don’t communicate until everyone is calm: If you or your teen is agitated, not is NOT the time to try and communicate. Your emotions will cloud your judgment, making it difficult to truly understand where the other person is coming from.
  4. Try not to lecture too much: Your teen doesn’t want to listen to what you have to say when you go into “lecture mode”. It’s important to suggest to them your opinion and experience, but they will not listen to you if you’re patronizing them.
  5. Take time to talk in those in-between moments: When you’re with your teen in the car or up late with them on weekend nights, take the time to talk to them and get to know them as people. You’d be surprised how meaningful those moments can be for your relationship with your teen.

Solstice can help

If your daughter is struggling with emotional and behavioral difficulties and you’re having trouble getting through to them, consider Solstice residential treatment center. Solstice helps teen girls ages 14-18 work through their struggles.

For more information about Solstice, please call (866) 278-3345.