• Residential Treatment Program for Teens 14-17

Family Therapy

therapy for adopted child

Therapy for Adopted Kids

Therapy for Adopted Kids 2560 1707 srtc_admin

Every adopted child is unique and has the potential to flourish in a loving home. However, because of the nature of adoption, there are several potential challenges that many adoptive parents will need to be prepared to confront. These include the aftereffects of trauma or neglect, feelings of abandonment, questions of identity, and social and emotional challenges related to race.

Some of the issues adopted children may struggle with include: a sense of abandonment, behavioral challenges, or attachment disorders. Children who experienced trauma or neglect may distrust the adults in their life and have difficulty cording with caregivers. It is important to understand your child’s issues and how they may relate to trauma versus just acting out. Seeking help for traumatized children can help parents put their child on a path to improved psychological health. 

Therapeutic Practice for Adopted Kids

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: CBT can be used for children who have a history of trauma. The cognitive piece works to change negative behaviors by addressing a person’s thoughts or perceptions that can lead to a distorted view. The behavioral piece focuses on modifying habitual responses to triggers or stimuli. CBT pulls together many techniques currently used by practitioners, such as behavior and anger management, affect regulation, problem-solving, social skills training, cognitive restructuring, and communication. The advantage of this program is that all of these techniques, relevant handouts, training examples, and outcome measures are integrated in a structured approach that practitioners and supervisors can easily access and use.

Group Therapy: In group therapy, a small number of participants meet together under the guidance of a professionally trained therapist. During this time, group members are able to increase their social development skills and also help others develop their skills as well. Group therapy can help children gain a feeling of acceptance from their peers, improve self-esteem, teach self-regulation skills, and provide an opportunity for them to “role play” the lessons they learn in the group with their peers. 

Family Therapy: Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is often short term and can include all family members or just those who are willing and able to participate. Family members who participate should be open to discussing difficult family issues and be willing to openly and respectfully communicate with other family members. Family therapy can teach both parents and children skills needed to deepen family connections, even through stressful times. 

However you choose to work through your child’s issues, it is important to see your child as a whole. Not every issue is tied to their adoption. Making sure that your child’s emotional and physical needs are being met is a good first step towards their overall mental health. 

Solstice RTC Can Help

Family therapy interventions are at the heart of our clinical program. We firmly believe in the strong nature and immense importance of family relationships. Research studies on the effectiveness of residential treatment indicate that the most significant factor in creating positive long-term outcomes for the child is parental involvement in the treatment process. Parental involvement is defined not only by the parents being actively involved in the child’s treatment, but being actively involved in their own treatment and growth process.

The core of our programming is based on healing damaged relationships and restoring healthy connections within the family system. In addition to weekly family therapy sessions by phone or video-conference, we also invite families to come to participate in face-to-face family therapy sessions. For more information please call (801) 919-8858.

blame and shame in relationships

How to Navigate Family Conflict Without Blame

How to Navigate Family Conflict Without Blame 2560 1437 srtc_admin

Conflict happens in every family. And while it is completely normal, it is important to deal with conflict in a healthy way. If you find that your conversations around family issues lead to yelling or slamming doors, it may be time to evaluate your communication methods. Talking in circles or playing the blame game fuels tension and the focus becomes who is right instead of finding a solution to the problem.

Communicating Without Blame

Good communication is the foundation of a healthy relationship. When you are able to communicate effectively, you build trust and feel supported. 

  • Use “I” Statements: An “I” statement is a style of communication that focuses on the feelings or beliefs of the speaker rather than thoughts and characteristics that the speaker attributes to the listener. For example, if your teen isn’t cleaning their room after you’ve asked them multiple times, instead of saying “You still haven’t cleaned your room. You’re so irresponsible!” You can try, “I feel disrespected when I have to ask you multiple times to clean your room.”. 
  • Take Responsibility: It’s easy to feel defensive during an argument. Despite feeling frustrated in the moment, in most conflicts, there is fault on both sides. Instead of putting all the blame on the other person, take a moment to think about how your actions or behaviors may have contributed to the conflict. Admitting that you may have played a role in the problem helps the other person feel like they’re not just being attacked for their mistakes. 
  • Approach Conflict with a Problem Solving Attitude: Instead of focusing on how you are right and your teen is wrong during conflict, think about how you can come up with a solution that will make both parties feel heard and supported. When we get caught up in who is right, it leaves no room for moving forward towards a solution.
  • Take a Break: Not every conflict is going to be solved in the moment. If emotions are getting high and one person is placing blame on the other, take a break. You can have an understanding in your family if at any time a conflict becomes counterproductive, you are always welcome to take a break to de-escalate and come back to the conversation when everyone feels more calm and ready to find a solution. 
  • Seek Help: While it would be nice to be able to solve all of our problems on your own, there may be times when you need to seek outside help. If your family is unable to resolve conflict and you find yourselves in the cycle of arguments and blame, a family therapist can help. A trained mental health professional can help your family identify areas of conflict and work with you to build healthy communication skills to work through those issues in the future. 

Solstice RTC Can Help

Our mission is to support adolescents and their families in developing excellence in relationships, influence, character, and health throughout their life journey. Through relationship-based programming, we help students restore and rebuild healthy, close relationships with their families, peers, and staff.

Family therapy interventions are at the heart of our clinical program. We firmly believe in the strong nature and immense importance of family relationships. Research studies on the effectiveness of residential treatment indicate that the most significant factor in creating positive long-term outcomes for the child is parental involvement in the treatment process. Parental involvement is defined not only by the parents being actively involved in the child’s treatment but being actively involved in their own treatment and growth process. For more information please call (866) 278-3345.

handling family conflict

Family Conflict: How To Come Together Instead of Falling Apart

Family Conflict: How To Come Together Instead of Falling Apart 2560 1707 srtc_admin

Conflict in families can become more pronounced as children transition into adolescence, as teens crave independence and don’t necessarily want to run to their parents with every problem they are facing. What may have started off as an innocuous conversation about a homework assignment or an outfit choice can quickly turn into a heated argument, leaving all family members hurt and confused.

While some conflict during the teen years is healthy and normal, it can be stressful when it feels like constant conflicts are getting out of hand. There are many conflict management strategies that you and your teen can use to help solve problems together.


Ways Teens and Families Can Work Together to Resolve Conflict

Finding appropriate ways to work together as a family to resolve conflict can strengthen your relationship with your child as well as reduce family stress levels. Learning how to healthily manage conflict can also help your teen develop key relationship skills they will need as they transition into adulthood.

To set yourself up for success in working together with your teen, it can be helpful to readjust your mindset and perspective so you can identify the source of the conflict. Before addressing a conflict head-on, try perspective-taking by thinking back to what it was like when you were a teenager. While perspective-taking allows you to relate better to your teen, keep in mind that your teen might not be able to reciprocate as teenage brain development can hinder them from understanding the risks and consequences of a situation.

As you prepare for conversations with your teen, try to remain flexible on the smaller issues; your child will be more willing to listen to the bigger issues if they feels like they are not being criticized at every turn. It’s also important to gauge your own emotions before attempting to engage in conversation. If you are angry or upset that is likely to come across in your discussion and could result in further hurt feelings.

During conflict resolution conversations, eliminate all distractions and create an environment where both parties can truly listen to what the other is saying. Be sure to allow space for your teen to speak and share their perspective so they knows that their voice and stance on the issue matters as well. To effectively communicate your feelings, let their know why you want their to do or not do something. For example, “I feel worried about your safety when I don’t know where you are”. Conveying that your main concern is for their well-being will let their know that you care about their and what happens to her.

After both sides have shared their perspectives, be prepared to negotiate and arrive at a compromise. Compromising teaches teens important problem-solving skills and allows them to feel like they have truly been part of the resolution process. If despite your best efforts, conflicts persist, you could consider alternative options like Solstice RTC.

Solstice RTC Can Help

Solstice RTC is a leading residential treatment program for young girls and assigned female at birth ages 14-17 that has been specifically designed to help families resolve conflicts and strengthen connections. We specialize in helping teens who struggle with anxiety, depression, trauma, and relationships by utilizing a unique blend of therapeutic techniques based on traditional and holistic methods.

Our mission is to support teenage girls and assigned female at birth and their families in creating strong, lasting relationships. The core of our programming focuses on healing damaged relationships and restoring healthy connections within the family system. For more information about how Solstice RTC can help strengthen your family bonds and assist your child with building and maintaining healthy relationships, please call (866) 278-3345.